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I wouldn't worry about "averaging down" ("reducing cost basis"). I also wouldn't blindly invest across the board. You should always put more money into the stocks that you think will perform better. The current price shouldn't have any influence over that at all. With 10 different stocks and if you're doing your analysis correctly, you should be able to ...


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Read JL Collins stock series. Part 10 provides a good explanation of why a large regulated brokerage that tracks an index can't crash. "1. You are not investing in Vanguard, you are investing in one or more of the mutual funds it manages. The Vanguard mutual funds are held as separate entities. Their assets are separate from Vanguard, they each carry ...


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If something happens to the mutual fund and it crashes, you lose everything. Nothing will happen to the mutual fund that doesn't also happen to the underlying index. What might happen is that the brokerage goes bankrupt or collapses due to some malfeasance. The SIPC should pick up the pieces after you, but that will take time. Better to just invest with ...


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If something happens to the mutual fund and it crashes, you lose everything. Theoretically, yes, but the point of diversification is that the odds of ALL of the underlying stocks going to zero is infinitesimal. Certainly there can be large economy-wide crashes, which is why you can further diversify into multiple mutual funds covering different markets (...


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Congrats on the great equity gain there. Not sure if I'll be able to help much but here are some suggestions/things to think about. (1) Why are you focused on dividend paying stocks? This seems like it would increase your capital gains taxes. See Berkshire Hathaway strategy. Consider moving your investments to ones that pay fewer dividends, or ones that ...


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