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61

PayPal has a couple of articles that discuss the dispute process. One is addressed to the buyer, and the other is addressed to the seller. The seller’s article is perhaps more informative: it discusses the process and the differences between a dispute, claim, chargeback, and bank reversal. From your question, it seems that you issued a dispute. After you ...


47

tl;dr: Based on your recent update that the receipt says cash refund, which you didn't receive, if it were me, I'd just dispute it now and be done with it. Note: The previous version of this answer is based on the refund being issued to a credit card, which no longer applies to this specific question. I'm leaving it for future readers that may be interested ...


26

Yes, dispute the charge. A dispute usually is open by the credit card for a period such as 30 days; if the refund is processed within that period, the dispute is moot and you are made whole. If the credit doesn't appear in 30 days it will come down to the credit card policy which side to take; you have documentation showing the business' intent and from the ...


21

+1 to @Ben Miller for explaining how to file a dispute with PayPal. Last year I ordered a FlashFish Power station. The price was suspiciously low but the web site appeared legitimate. They provided me with a USPS tracking number and every few days I received an E-mail update as to which city the package had passed through. Eventually I received a ...


20

I now realize the manager's refund to my card was completely fake: it says the refund total on a line saying "CASH: amount", no credit card line is listed. In addition to what others have already said, this is potentially an embezzlement scheme. The (ostensible) manager enters a cash refund in the register, but instead of giving you the cash, puts ...


11

A vendor accepting/taking ongoing payments should have the ability to find an account given the card number. Of course "should" doesn't always result in that actually happening. The next step is to contact the card issuer, and give them the exact details. While I realize that one may have legitimate recurring billings on their card, this is the ...


7

Is this an appropriate situation in which to use my credit card's "dispute charge" feature? Or is that a misuse of this feature? Yes, this is a legitimate use of this feature. Call your bank and ask to be connected to the dispute department. Explain your story and they will gladly guide you on how to best proceed. They might very well say "Oh ...


6

File a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Do not pay any more money on this bill until this collection company sends you verification of the debt. I think you are likely to be taken advantage of by this collection company because they are already telling you that you owe the full amount, which is not correct as you stated you have been ...


3

You didn't specify the country, so your mileage might vary. Every time I opened a dispute through a Russian bank, the first thing the bank always did was contact the vendor and ask for their version of the story. The bank person would see all your transaction history with that vendor. If the vendor did issue the refund, they would tell the bank so, the bank ...


2

but the merchant cannot locate his profile I'd say that's a justifiable reason to get your CC to reject new charges. Don't try to be evasive and cancel your credit card because if you stop paying attention to it then it can continue racking up charges from existing contracts. If you were on a contract, 12 months for example, then the merchant can easily ...


1

Yes, of course. What you describe seems like a text-book case of why banks have “dispute a charge” features. Here in the UK, that shouldn't be necessary… you wouldn't need half those details to win the legal argument. Yet, however clearly you're going to win if you take the restaurant to court to get your refund, your bank's “dispute a charge” service will ...


1

Dispute it is the right answer, because if the merchant does/did actually process the refund, the onus will be on them to prove that they did. Provide your receipt as evidence to the issuing financial institution of the card. They have people that specialize in recovering funds from merchants. They will know exactly how to argue with the merchant on your ...


1

In US the legal minimum is 60 days from the date the card issuer bills you (not the date the charge is posted); this is set by the Fair Credit Billing Act, see https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0221-billed-merchandise-you-never-received and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Credit_Billing_Act . The card issuer (and/or brand) can by their own policy ...


1

There is a document the describes this. You need to review the terms and conditions for that particular credit card. It could also be called the cardmember agreement. The protections could even depend on the state you live in, because some states have stronger consumer protection laws. The terms and conditions will describe the timelines, and methods to ...


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