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158

Yes, you can dispute the charge. The deposit was to secure a particular bike. The point of that money was to ensure that you were an earnest buyer, or that he would have some money for his trouble if you backed out. You didn't back out, he did; so he owes you the money back. If there was a written agreement, he would not have sold your bike. I would tell ...


20

You should dispute the transaction with the credit card. Describe the story and attach the cash payment receipt, and dispute it as a duplicate charge. There will be no impact on your score, but if you don't have the cash receipt or any other proof of the alternative payment - it's your word against the merchant, and he has proof that you actually used your ...


18

My experience is with Visa and Amex. The companies both will tell you to check your statement and if there is any question, immediately call the card contact number and "dispute" the charge. That will protect you and put a hold on the vendor's account until a resolution is investigated and resolved. Never delay. IF you delay past the card agreement, ...


16

Most merchants (also in Europe) are reasonable, and typically are willing to work with you. credit card companies ask if you tried to work with the merchant first, so although they do not enforce it, it should be the first try. I recommend to give it a try and contact them first. If it doesn't work, you can always go to the credit card company and have the ...


14

You have no legal basis to stop payment to the Credit Card Company, as even the court already clarified. I understand that for you the money you pay the credit card company is the same money you expect to not get back from the vendor, but legally it's not related. It would be the same as if you stopped paying rent - the landlord would have little ...


13

You have no grounds for a refund. The flight took off on time, and you chose not to be on board. The fact that the airline could not guarantee ahead of time that the flight would leave on time is not relevant. You can certainly try to dispute the charge with the airline, and it sounds like you have done so. The airline correctly indicates that your dispute ...


12

You don't need to pay unless you really owe the money. The burden of proof is on them. If you don't believe you really owe the money (and it sounds like you don't believe so) - you can dispute it against the collection company and the credit reporting agencies. Here's the instructions on how to do it. They can call and nag you and harass and threaten you ...


11

The magic phrase is "Then you'll have to process a chargeback". In credit card terms, disputing a charge with a credit card company is called a chargeback and vendors hate them. Chargebacks are worse than refunds. He will get charged money just because you ordered a chargeback, and then he'll lose the $500 on top of that if he can't prove to the credit ...


10

Yes, you can dispute it. But don't worry about bringing your credit card company into it yet. He knows that no court will believe you paid a deposit on an unspecified bike. He's bluffing.


9

The short answer is you're going to need to contact an attorney. Your country/state laws may have unique conditions, interpretations, and precedents. Ideally, you created a partnership agreement when you bought the property that specifies what happens in this situation. If there is no such agreement in place, you're likely going to have to go to court to ...


9

I doubt there is anything you can do to convince them you paid, outside of just talking to them, which it seems you already tried. These are the possibilities I can think of for how this happened: The cashier pocketed the money. The cashier misplaced the payment and it has not been found yet. The cashier misplace the payment and someone else pocketed it. ...


8

As a rule of thumb, go in the order of proximity to the transaction. This would typically mean: Merchant first. This is the easiest for everyone. The merchant has motivation to keep their customers happy, and also not get dinged by a credit card dispute, which could affect their reputation with their processor and possibly have a cost too. Interim payment ...


8

What you are looking for is travel insurance. I have never heard of this being offered as a credit card perk, but there might be something out there. You can buy this separately, but only you can decide if it is worth the costs. To me, it would seem to only be worth it for something quite expensive, like a cruise that costs thousands of dollars. The more ...


7

Try going in and talking to the manager of the Best Buy store. It is certainly within his or her power to reverse the charge, if he believes you. At the very least, he should be able to show you the signature. (Unfortunately, in this day and age of electronic signature pads, signatures are not worth much anymore, in my opinion. My signature on those ...


7

The Federal Trade Commission has a page on Disputing Errors on Credit Reports. According to them, under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) both the credit reporting agency and the information provider (credit card company) are responsible for correcting the error on your credit report. They recommend contacting both in writing, and even have sample ...


6

So far their response has been that they are offering to give a full refund, but I don't think that's acceptable. If they are willing to give a full refund, to an extent this is fair. Can they get away with misleading pricing? Yes / No. As this is online retailer in other country, it would be difficult to pursue a resolution via mails / phone. Who ...


6

I'm going to simplify your situation and restate it for clarity: I owe Citibank $10,000. A company owes me $2,000. If I tell Citibank I will not pay them the $10,000 until after I receive the $2,000 owed to me, will Citibank help me retrieve the $2,000? I believe when stated this way the answer is unfortunately, but clearly: No, it won't help at all. (...


5

EDIT To answer what I think you question is: I do not know of anything other than trip cancellation insurance. And you must be very careful that the policy you purchase for your trip covers the circumstance you described. Essentially, you opted not to take the flight. Not all trip cancellation policies will cover that. How to Find Trip Cancellation ...


5

Was the credit card opened in your name, or is it someone else's card and erroneously shows on your account? If it's someone else's account, sit tight and let the bureaus sort it out. If it's in your name, you need to file a police report immediately. This will constitute a formal "identity theft report" in the eyes of the CFPB. You must submit THIS to the ...


5

Under the Fair Credit Billing Act, you have some rights - however, you must act quickly to protect them. If the creditor's investigation determines the bill is correct, you must be told promptly and in writing how much you owe and why. You may ask for copies of relevant documents. At this point, you'll owe the disputed amount, plus any finance charges ...


5

The US Postal Service will return the package to the sender free of charge if the package has not been opened. You can simply mark "Refused" across your address perhaps including the caption "return to sender".


5

Here's a reasonable example of how an unauthorized charge could be disputed on a cancelled card: Monday, my card is used fraudulently, Tuesday I cancel my card. I'm old-fashioned so I don't check online, I just get my paper statement mailed each month. So about a month later I get my statement and see the fraudulent charge. I immediately call to dispute it. ...


4

There are two directions you can go: (a) ask Comcast to send you a note verifying the account has no balance. They should have no issue doing this. (b) use the dispute process with the reporting agency. They have 90 days for Comcast to tell them the debt is real or they must remove it. Note - you should pull the reports from the other two major agencies. ...


4

You could make an entry for the disputed charge as if you were going to lose the dispute, and a second entry that reverses the charge as if you were going to win the dispute. You could then reconcile the account by including the first charge in the reconciliation and excluding the reversal until the issue has been resolved.


4

A few points: The reason your lender is asking you to be above 580 is because that is the magic number for an FHA loan where your down payment would be only 3.5% (the US Government effectively subsidizes the rest of your down pmt). If you had a score lower than that (but still above 500), you will need to put 10% down which is still less than the typical 20%...


4

Contact the company, tell them it finally arrived and you want them to pay for return shipping and credit you with the return. A good store will do that. Get the return authorization number and the name and title of the person you spoke to. Once you have that arranged, contact the bank and tell them what you have just agreed to, so they can make sure the ...


4

As others have said, dispute it immediately. The dispute process exists for exactly this situation. You may also want to contact your state's attorney general. This behavior is illegal, and it may even be a crime. You have no way of knowing how this dealer is treating other customers, but the AG's office can investigate if they see fit.


4

This answer brought to you by the word "Contemporaneous". When you dispute a charge, it costs the merchant $10-$100 depending. As such, it is a common courtesy to warn the merchant of your intent to chargeback, to give them a chance to reverse the charge willingly for free. This shop has passed the point where you owe them that courtesy. Of course, ...


3

Can a chip card be cloned or spoofed? Yes, but it is not easy and has yet to be (to my knowledge) truly experienced in the "wild". In 2014 there were reports of a form of fraud involving convincing a system that a chip card was used, called "Replay", but this didn't involve visiting local stores. My bet would be either that this was on your aforementioned ...


3

Speaking from personal experience regarding ID theft, please note that if someone was able to fraudulently open a line of credit under your name, they may have enough information about you to do significantly more damage than just having a line of credit. They may also, for example: Be able to access and view your credit file from the credit reporting ...


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