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If I were in South Africa, why would I ever take out a margin loan in ZAR when I could have it in AUD at a much lower interest rate? The answer is trivial: as the exchange rate changes one way or the other, that difference will absolutely crush (one way or the other) the almost-irrelevant interest rate. It's exactly like asking "Why can't I drive my ...


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The difference in interest rates largely reflects the market’s view of future currency movements. Someone wants a higher interest rate to lend to you in ZAR precisely because they expect those rand to be worth less when you repay the loan. So trying to find the cheapest currency in which to borrow is simply another way of trying to beat the market, which is ...


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Seems to me the risk you run is charging prices that differ from what you quote. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating. If $100 CAD equals $78 USD at the moment, suppose I see the price in US Dollars, and I agree to pay $78 USD... now suppose an hour later when you process the transaction for $100 CAD, the rate is now $79 USD, and my bank takes $79 USD ...


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I think you've addressed some of the concerns that I would have in the comments: Who would do the conversion from USD to CAD? Or would you just deposit USD payments separately? What rate do you use? Do you try to use a "live" conversion rate or just use a static rate and accept any currency risk? I definitely think it's disingenuous (maybe even ...


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The displayed price must be what you actually charge me. This is non-negotiable. If your website says $78 USD and then I buy the item, and exchange rates have changed and I actually pay $81 USD, that is unacceptable, probably illegal. If I actually pay $75, I won't complain. If your website says "$100 CAD", or "$100 CAD (about $78 USD)", ...


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