New answers tagged

0

The merchant does have a responsibility to not charge more than was authorized, but if they fail to fulfill that responsibility, then it being corrected is dependent on the customer. You use the term "credit card company", which when used by lay people can be ambiguous as to whether it's referring to the issuing bank (the bank the money is coming from) or ...


1

This happened to my father. At a restaurant in a beach town he bought some T-shirts on the same charge as a meal (at the counter when paying, the server didn't bring them), and tipped on the meal amount only. The management scaled up to an 18% final tip on the total. It was on my father to notice. When my father reconciled the statement with the ...


6

It is always your responsibility to verify that the charges on your account are accurate. Some credit card companies are proactive in this, looking for anomalous charges and alerting the consumer to verify whether or not the transaction is legitimate. But this cannot be counted on; people occasionally make purchases that are different than what they have ...


2

They are not all italic. Many are because they are one brand or another despite the bank/institution branding. Most are either Master Card or Visa and those companies have come up with a standard on how to print. My last AMEX had its security code embossed like the credit card number. My latest visa has a printed credit card number and the security code ...


9

Honestly... when you want to send money to a friend, you'd use PayPal, Zelle, Venmo, Cashapp, or some other modern digital method, right? So would he, if he really wanted to pay off your credit cards.


0

He could just send you cash. This is a scam.


22

It's a scam. To use a credit card on-line, you typically need 4 things: the name on the account, the account number, the expiration date, and the CVV number. The first three are on the front of your card; the last is on the back. If you send him the images, you will not see any payments on your card. You will, however, see a bunch of charges that you will ...


2

I'm assuming the context for your question is a checking account in the US with a debit card, and you know the BIN on the debit card and are trying to determine the ABA routing number for the checking account. Unfortunately, the answer is no - there is no inherent relationship between BIN and routing number, and there are inconsistencies from bank to bank ...


1

I have an upcoming purchase that will be just over $2000, and recalled this question. I tried to pay $2000 more than my balance on my card, and this is the note I got back via email. Now, I did try to pay it directly to the card issuing bank. I don't (yet) know what they'd do if I made a payment via ACH through my own bank. So for this type of situation, I'...


0

I can only speak from my experience with various American credit cards (issued by U.S. Bank and Capital One). In cases where the current balance is less than the statement balance, paying the current balance will result in no interest charges. This makes sense because what amount could interest even be charged on if the current balance is $0 when the next ...


3

Is there anything more I can do? Make and follow a budget. (The fred_do_u answer is more than adequate in showing you how to do that.) Live below your means. Apply all your extra cash to the debt. Use the Debt Avalanche method (more efficient) or the Debt Snowball method (can be more emotionally satisfying). We had $32K of CC debt, and that's how we ...


1

If you intend to avoid using credit cards, that leaves cash and the requirement to manage it carefully. Of course, whatever method you choose to use to manage your money, willpower is a must. As a youth, I followed a self-created program that I later learned was called the envelope method. Mine was a virtual envelope system based on my checking account (...


2

It all depends on how you received the cash back reimbursement of $20. With some credit card companies, the website tells that you have $20 available as cash back and offers the options of (a) getting a check in the mail for $20, (b) having the money credited towards your credit card balance, (c) getting a gift card usable at a specific merchant's store (in ...


3

Yes, you're required to pay the Minimum Payment Due. However, you're never required to pay more than the actual Balance Owed. This may not make sense in the Internet age. But the concept of a Statement Balance is rooted in the tradition of mailing statements: That is why "billing cycles" exist. Traditionally, you would be expected to keep track of ...


4

If your current balance is $180, many banks won't let you pay $200. And, at any rate, from an obligation standpoint, a current balance of $180 means you owe $180, and once you've paid that off, you have no obligation. It doesn't matter if your statement says you owed $200 or $20,000; if the current balance is $180 you only need to pay $180. In other words: ...


1

It's really hard to give general answers to questions that present such specific scenarios, because the method your issuing bank uses to calculate balance and interest may be different than what we guess at, in ways that have big impacts on your result. You may also not be aware of details that make an impact: Is there a grace period on new purchases on ...


3

If you have some flexibility in when you can start the course, here's what I would do with your $1,200 surplus: Wait 4 months, pay off card B completely, then pay for your course with cash. Anything else is playing with fire. All it takes is one "emergency" that prevents you from making a full payment, and you're paying much more interest that you could if ...


0

In the UK there are a couple of credit cards available which offer a 0% rate on money transfers. Other cards also allow money transfers, however tend to charge a punitive rate of interest so I wouldn't suggest considering those as serious options. Your wife could take out a 0% money transfer credit card (if there's one available in your country), use a money ...


2

which of the following is a better estimate of my credit card utilization ratio: 0% This one: the credit scoring companies only know what the banks tell them, and -- in my experience -- they only after a billing cycle. Thus, if your balance is $0 on the statement date, that's what they tell the credit bureaus. Two of my own recent observations: 1 - ...


4

Unfortunately, the hard-truth answer to your question is it depends because different issuing banks can have slightly different policies for reporting data to the credit bureaus. So, if you want the literal answer for a specific bank, you should call them and ask. However, in a general sense, the process of submitting data to credit bureaus isn't inherently ...


1

I don't think that any bank will issue a credit card solely to a minor (I suspect it isn't legal, but they wouldn't want an unsecured debt against a minor anyway). One option that I've seen is to open a joint credit card account with them with a low maximum (https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/what-is-the-minimum-age-to-be-an-authorized-user.php ...


0

I have no actual experience with trying this, but I think giving your kids each a reloadable prepaid debit card might be the best way to handle it. Such cards are usable online and in person as if they were standard credit/debit cards, and you can fund them electronically through your own bank. Plus, since they're debit, they can convert it to cash at ...


3

No, you will not get charged a fee by either bank for paying your card off in this manner. Sometimes there are extra perks for having a checking account and credit card with the same institution, but never a fee just for using different banks and paying between them.


7

Pros of Saving Points When you do decide to redeem them, you won't have to worry about meeting the minimum threshold. If there are "specials" for redeeming (like getting discounted gift cards) you'll be positioned to take advantage of them. It might feel better to be getting "more" all at once This doesn't sound like it applies to you, but for some point ...


7

Safe? No. Your 'authorized user' can simply call the credit card company and say he never got the card. They will ask him some personal data for verification (but obviously, he knows his name, address, and SSN), and he can change the delivery address and get a new card mailed, or write down the credit card number and use it online. Then he racks up the ...


0

It cost the merchant money to implement a payment gateway to a particular credit card provider. So the merchant may choose whichever payment provider that give them the favoured terms and price and match its pool of potential client. You can check out the payment gateway fees charged. I.e. A minimum setup will cost the merchant $119 for first 100 ...


6

I'm not sure about EU laws specifically, but as far as I know merchants can definitely discriminate between credit card issuers. I also do not see any official way to have AMEX contact a merchant to try and get their cards accepted. The best way to get that changed is to simply tell the merchant (at checkout or in some "tell us how we did" review). The ...


0

You could use PayPal, register there your IBANs [PANs] and transfers from IBAN1 [PAN1] to PayPal (PayPal top-up) and then from PayPal to IBAN2 [PAN2] (Transfer). If you use cards I think you have to transfer at least 100$ (here is 100€) to have the transaction for free. But if yours are debit card (that are linked to a plain old bank account) why you don't ...


Top 50 recent answers are included