41

There are two parts to the hack you describe. One is moving to a high-cost, high-pay country to work, and the other is moving to a low-cost, low-pay country to retire. As Dilip mentioned in a comment, the first part is not so easy in many cases. You can't just take a plane to the USA and start making big bucks immediately. In the first place, it's ...


35

I was at a restaurant in NYC, 1st Avenue and 63rd street. I don't recall how the conversation started, but the woman at the next table remarked how none of her friends from the West side, 9th avenue or thereabout, would visit her. Less than 2 miles away, yet in their minds, too far. Your question isn't likely to be answered with facts, but opinion. In this ...


17

Different priorities At retirement age, your life priorities are somewhat different, and two key items come to mind. 1. Social circle Your social circle, community and extended family contacts are highly related with your lifespan at retirement age. Loneliness kills, literally. Long distance relocation would weaken those ties exactly at the time when you ...


10

I'm currently working as an expat, and my grandparents used to work overseas but retired to Canada so you could say my family has done things completely the opposite of what you suggest. However there are a number of very good reasons that my grandparents have done things the way we have, and I think it's worth sharing the rationale there. Low-cost moving ...


7

One thing not mentioned is that in so called third world countries, a lot of "stuff" isn't actually less expensive. Food is almost always less expensive, housing is often less expensive, but cars, fuel, computers, smartphones, electronics, brand name clothing, shoes, cosmetics, tools, art supplies, internet service, bicycles, sporting goods and many other ...


5

I should think the primary reason is due why those countries have a higher standard of salary - its not what you get, but what it buys you. In a high-salary, low-exchange-rate country like Sweden, you get a lot of services that your taxes buy you. Healthcare and quality of life in a stable country is something you want when you get old (note that your ...


4

First measure the actual power draw for your devices, or you may waste effort through premature optimization. It might not be worth the trouble to unplug an idle device every night just to save a penny or two. I suggest you get your hands on something like the Kill-A-Watt, to begin with. Essentially, it's a pass-through device that measures power ...


4

The SPDR ETF GLD? The fund intends one share to match 0.10 ounce of gold, and the wikipedia article states it's one of the top 10 holders of bullion in the world.


4

Laser hair removal isn't permanent, you have to have several sessions to get all of the hair, each session costing hundreds. And then it may only last a few years before you have hair growing back again. It's not worth the money unless you have such a large amount that you can throw away several thousand. As others have said, either buy blades in bulk or ...


3

In more high-end restaurants they can track orders of each of the guests and provide separate checks in their order management system. In more "common" establishments, you'll probably have to split your bill with your friend yourself, unless the server does this for you manually.


3

In many states the manufacturer can't sell directly to you. In those states they must use a dealer. That is the exact problem that Tesla has been having. They have been trying to get the state laws overturned but it has been a long process. The biggest problem is the one that some stores have. People come in, play with the floor models, then go home and ...


3

No one here has mentioned electronic shavers. I purchased one for about $120 two years ago. It's still going strong and I've only had it professionally cleaned one time. I also find this method to be more time efficient as compared to shaving with a blade- I live in Toronto and commute to work and it is not unusual to see men shaving while sitting in their ...


3

Political instability and general inability of the government to control crime, economomy, or even remain in existence, would be my greatest worry. I wouldn't want my bank account to randomly disappear, criminals to come take my stuff and/or life by force because nobody is going to stop them, or a hoarde of revolutionaries appearing at my door telling me "...


3

Hm, surprised nobody has mentioned tech gadgets yet. I'm surprised how many undergrads run around with the latest iPhone, iPad, MacBook, of course all with unlimited data etc. There's just no reason to drop $1500 on a laptop and to pay $50 a month for a cell phone plan.


3

Not a lot, but enough to make it worth the effort. Each broker is different in how much they charge for services, including their own profit margin. I recently refinanced a large (but not jumbo) mortgage. I checked about 6 different brokers and online lenders. The closing costs for the loans with the same interest rate ranged from about 1% to 3% of the ...


3

When I bought a used car, I went with the following characteristics: Under 100k miles. Cheap. Reliable model. Newer than 2000. I bought from an actual person instead of a dealer, and was willing to wait a while for a good deal, which also helped keeping things cheap. (And obviously ran a vehicle history and then an inspection before buying.) You don't ...


2

I've found you can give the money to charity. If you text REDCROSS to 90999 for example you can give $10 to the redcross


2

I don't know if BJ's or Costco is by you, but sharing a membership can make sense. Not just the annual fee, but splitting certain items that are just too big. The 20 pack of batteries, the 30lb sacks of potatoes, etc. Anything you look at and realize you won't use it before it goes bad or have no place to store it. Size is one objection I hear regarding the ...


2

I look ahead for sizes. I was at the thrift store and saw a good condition, good brand winter coat that will likely fit my daughter next year, so I bought it. I also bought a snowsuit my baby can wear when he's 6 months (~5 months pregnant now). When it starts getting cold next fall, I'll be set, rather than wasting time and money running around town ...


2

Cheapest is one thing. You can absolutely shop in the market and find the lowest possible price. I can think of three places to shop, each with an up and downside. I would think that what you really mean is the best price for the service. Just like shopping for a car you have to decide what you need vs what is nice to have. How To Shop Decide what ...


2

How low you can reduce your costs does depend on your calling pattern. How many minutes per month you call locally; call long distance; call internationally; and how many minutes you receive calls for. If all these figures are low, you can be better off with a pay-per-minute service, if any of the outbound figures are high then you could consider a flat-...


2

I know folks who considered retiring to another country. Their conclusion was that while base cost of living was lower, the cost of the things that they enjoy doing -- not to mention the cost of spending time with friends they didn't want to give up -- would be sufficiently higher to erase most of the advantages. Those of us who grew up in or close to ...


2

If your goal is to simply save money on shaving supplies, there are easier ways to do so. If you are buying the latest Gillette multi-blade razor cartridge, then yes, you are spending a lot of money on razor blades. Consider switching to an old-fashioned double-edge safety razor. Pick up a nice razor for $20 - $50 (I like my Merkur HD), then buy the ...


2

I have some gold investments. I simply bought a couple of small bars of gold and put them in my house. That's pretty cheap in terms of storage costs. Why don't you want to do it this way? You won't find cheaper storage. Anyway, looking at the numbers presented; 0.01% holding fee per month. So after a year, you'd be down around 0.10% So if you had 100 ...


2

I'd advise you to just find a friend that has a similar plan and look at their bill. In NC, sales taxes are paid on the amount before discounts/coupons are applied... so, if you buy a $300 item with a $100 coupon here you pay $200 + sales taxes on $300... instead of $200 (about $21 instead of $14). Point being that elected officials come up with these ...


2

There are two fees given in dollar amounts, and the rest are given as percentages. So presumably, the former will the fixed amounts, while the latter are percentages. If you want to be sure, you can google the names of the fees, or ask Verizon (while they can't tell you what the amount of the taxes will be, they should be able to tell you how they are ...


1

The cheapest way to store physical metals is to take delivery, and keep them yourself. The "goldbugs" have a saying - "if you don't hold it, you don't own it". Or, to put it another way, just because somebody says that there are a pile of gold bars in a vault with your name on them, doesn't mean that there actually are any gold bars in that vault.


1

One possible option, depending on your dinner habits, would be to ask for the bill right when you place your order - especially since your friend would likely be getting their bill at the end of the meal as usual, it makes it a lot less likely for your bills to be mis-divided, and since the bill is generated so close to your order, it seems like it would be ...


1

Here are the numbers from 2007-2008 http://www.bls.gov/cex/anthology11/csxanth6.pdf


1

A lot of good answers, but there’s one more factor: ignorance. The majority haven’t considered it, or considered it and assumed it’s not an option without investigating. PLUS, the widespread myth that every other country is primitive, unhealthy, and dangerous.


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