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In formal meetings, the notion of ‘quorum’ is usually distinct from ‘all members’. The quorum includes those who show up and those who submitted valid proxies. There are some motions in some contexts that require unanimous resolutions or resolutions without dissent, where everyone has to agree or at least not disagree, whether represented or not on the day. ...


4

What financial consideration would a company have when changing from Plan A to Plan B? Employees get access to some of the RSUs sooner, but the overall vesting period increases, so it's a trade-off. The company has cash outlays sooner, but spread them out over a longer period. From an expense standpoint, the expense is recognized over the vesting period, ...


2

The old vesting plan is unusual, the new vesting plan is much more common. I'd suspect that the company had an unusual vesting plan for some unusual reason and now that the company is getting more mature and "normal", the rationale for that unusual vesting plan has gone away. For example, consider an early company that's several years away from having a ...


1

Others have mentioned the concept of a quorum, but it's actually worse than that at some companies. Sometimes, to pass a shareholder resolution, it's required to get a majority (or even a super majority) of the whole number of shares issued. In those cases, not sending in your vote is the effective equivalent of voting no. Companies deliberately ...


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