46

TLDR: You will probably need to move to a different employer to get the raise you want/need/deserve. Some employers, in the US, punish longevity through a number of practices. My wife worked as a nurse for about 20 years. During that time she had many employers, leveraging raises with job changes. She quit nursing about 6 years ago and was being paid $...


17

Here are a few points to consider: Taxes: As a consultant, you will be responsible for the employer portion of the Social Security and Medicare taxes, and you might have to pay for state unemployment insurance and state disability insurance, as well. Office expenses: As a consultant, you may be required to buy your own laptop, pay for your own software ...


16

The process is fairly simple: The person that the check is made out to ("Pay to the order of ____") needs to sign the back of the check where it says "Endorse here". Then, go to a US bank that you have an account at and cash the check. If you do not have a US bank account then go to the bank displayed on the check or go to a retailer that can cash the ...


15

Any such number would depend on the country, the market, and the economic situation - especially inflation ratio. Generally, if you are not in a booming or a dying technology, getting a raise above the inflation ratio is 'good'; anything below is poor.


9

Part of your first link has this statement that I suspect you are missing: However, Section 13(a)(1) of the FLSA provides an exemption from both minimum wage and overtime pay for employees employed as bona fide executive, administrative, professional and outside sales employees. Note that executive is in that list. As for the additional note: To ...


7

FYI: Per the Family Medical Leave Act on 1993 (FMLA) most companies in the US (except small ones) are REQUIRED to give you maternity leave. They are not required, however, to pay you. You should also be aware of this eligibility proviso if she intends to switch companies: Employees must have worked at that company for at least 12 months. They also must ...


7

Why did you stay and watch the movie if you knew it was no longer in 3D? Possibly because you thought watching the movie was more valuable than trying to plan something else at the last minute. If you had asked for the refund when you found out it wasn't available in 3D, I wouldn't see any reason for them to refuse the refund. However, since they showed you ...


6

Keep in mind that unless you have a contract that says you get a certain amount of raise every year, the employer is not required to give you any raise. The quality of a raise is too subjective for anyone to tell you how to judge it. You either get a raise you can live with, it makes you content/happy, and you continue working there, or you get a raise ...


5

HCE is defined as being above 120k$ or in the top 20 % of the company. The exact cutoff point might be different for each company. Typically, only the base salary is considered for that, but it's the company's (and 401(k)-plan's) decision. The IRS does not require HCE treatment; the IRS requires that 401(k) plans have a 'fair' distribution of usage between ...


5

If you hold a joint account with another person, the limit would be double, as the limit applies per person. There is also a higher limit for temporary balances following a life event (such as following a house sale). Please be aware that the limit is per person, not per account, so there is no way around it by having multiple accounts. The limit is also ...


4

There are a few reasons, dependent on the location of the company. The first, as you mentioned is that it means that the employee is invested in the companies success - in theory this should motivate the employee to work hard in order to increase the value of their holdings. Sometimes these have a vestment period which requires that they hold the stock for ...


4

With LLCs, the operation agreement can define different shares for different kinds of income or equity, and different partners may be treated differently. In essence, you can end up with a different stock class for each partner/member. So you need to read the grant document and the OA really carefully to know what you're getting. You may want to have a ...


4

Even under the executive exemption, see Exemption for Executive Employees Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Section 13(a)(1) as defined by Regulations, 29 CFR Part 541, it seems that a minimum compensation is required. To qualify for the executive employee exemption, all of the following tests must be met: The employee must be compensated on a ...


4

In a small matter like this, especially when done on a large scale, there is a time factor. The dispute needs to be resolved quickly and efficiently because heady litigation of 300 moviegoers is an impossibility. You can't go back and re-litigate an agreement already made; as the lawyers say you can't have two bites of the apple. Unless you're Darth ...


3

This situation sounds better than most, the company it seems likely to be profitable in the future. As such it is a good candidate to have a successful IPO. With that your stock options are likely to be worth something. How much of that is your share is likely to be very small. The workers that have been their since the beginning, the venture ...


3

The employer match on the 401k is easy as that is simply the net amount of money they match (e.g. 4% of salary). The other items are a little trickier as there is their face value but what you really what to include is how much you value the benefit. I.e. if one offer has substantial better health insurance but you don't think that you will gain much ...


3

Taxable fringe benefits are included in taxable wages for the purpose of FLSA. So when those executives get to use company cars or company jets that value is "wage" even if it isn't salary.


3

$60-$100 US is typical for US 1099 contract IT work, but it varies quite a bit by location and industry. Contract agencies can charge more (sometimes significantly more), but you probably don't have the clout to ask for rates that are on par with those. $85 per hour might be a good starting point. Here are some factors to consider: Does the client ...


3

At the most basic level, the employee is getting a share of ownership in the company and would get a percentage of the sales price. That said, as littleadv alluded to, different share classes have different priorities and get paid in different orders. In a bankruptcy, for example, some classes almost never get paid in practice because they are so far down ...


3

Compensation information is available in the annual reports (10-k filings) which are available from the SEC EDGAR system or, generally, the company's website. Additionally, insider transactions are reported to the SEC so you can see when an insider buys or sells stock or exercises options received as compensation. Background: Nowadays board and officers ...


3

Yep, add it up! They don't give you, say, 30 days to accept an offer because you need 30 days to go to the post office - they are giving you the time to evaluate the offer. A simple request for information from HR will net you exactly (or at least rough terms for variable benefits) what you will pay for benefits, receive as over-salary compensation, and ...


3

I see a few ways to improve your comparison: COBRA is a temporary insurance plan meant to cover you between jobs and prevent issues with pre-existing conditions. $900/mo seems expensive for health insurance in general (maybe not for COBRA) unless you have health issues (I am blessed with good health and may be jaded) or a big family - I would shop around ...


3

It's useful to be aware that NS&I (National Savings and Investments) has no limit on protection. It's basically a state-owned savings bank and therefore in theory as low-risk (with regard to default) as government issued bonds ("gilts" in the UK) which are generally considered the "minimum risk asset". NS&I's website doesn't seem to go into any ...


2

@JoeTaxpayer's answer outlines how to value it. Some other considerations: As I understand it, some public pensions may be tax-free if you still live in the state that is paying the pension. E.g. when a Massachusetts teacher receives pension, it is exempt from state taxes, but if that person moves to Vermont he will have to pay Vermont income tax on those ...


2

Short term disability coverage will usually cover 40-60% of salary for 6 months. See if the employer offers a disability plan, or talk to the management about bringing in a company like Aflac or Unum that offers these benefits at little or no employer expense.


2

Okay, I'm going to give you my opinion based on experience; not any technical understanding. The options - by themselves - are pretty meaningless in terms of determining their value. The business plan going forward, their growth expectations, the additional options to be authorized, the additional preferred stock offers they anticipate, even current ...


2

Converting the comment from @MD-Tech into answer How or where could I find info about publicly traded companies about how stock owner friendly their compensation schemes are for their board and officers? This should be available in the annual report, probably in a directors' remunerations section for most companies


2

What makes a "standard" raise depends on how well the economy is doing, how well your particular industry is doing, and how well your employer is doing. All these things change constantly, so anyone who says, "a good raise is 5%" or whatever number is being simplistic. Even if true when he said it, it won't necessarily be true next year, or this year in a ...


2

You are not actually entitled to any raise at all, unless you had something contractually (legally binding) which made that so. I'm answering this from the UK, but it has been common practice for people over the last 10 years or so to receive no yearly raise, in some sectors. This is what I would consider a bad raise - if wages are not kept in line with ...


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