39

Have her chip in for the regular expenses, utilities, food, etc., and a bit for "rent." Then tell her to be sure to deposit to her retirement account, preferably a matched 401(k). It's admirable to want her to build 'equity' but it's pretty convoluted. You can't actually give her ownership, and in the event you break up (I know you won't, but this is to ...


16

There is no simple, legally reasonable, way for her to build equity by helping out with your mortgage, without her having a claim to your mortgage. The only 'equitable' thing she can do is rent from you. If you want her to be building equity, have her start and fund a brokerage account for herself. If you have an affinity for real estate, have her buy ...


8

I agree with everyone who has simply told you 'Dont' and 'You can't' and add a few more considerations that you don't want to deal with: Any rental payments towards the loan expense you collect from your girlfriend must be reported on your tax return as income, usually as a 1099 which adds to your marginal tax rate. You say you've purchased an 'apartment', ...


5

all the other answers are spot on, but look at it this way. really all you mean when you say "building equity" is "accumulating wealth". if that is the goal, then having her invest the money in a brokerage (e.g. ira) account makes a lot more sense. if you can't afford the apartment without her, then you can't afford to pay out her portion of the equity in ...


3

I'm glad that you feel like being fair and equitable to your party. Other answerers are, of course, correct that being fair and equitable to your girlfriend is not in your best interests but that's not what you're trying to do here and I commend you for it. There is nothing that stops you drawing up a simple legal contract giving your girlfriend a share of ...


3

In Ontario, common law marriage requires 3 years of cohabitation, and doesn't give rights to property (which remains separate). I'd say in your situation you can still file as single, but I'd suggest asking your tax accountant to be sure.


2

Have her pay something like a friendly monthly rent. This should be less than half of the monthly mortgage cost, since you are assuming the risk (and benefits) of a mortgage and closer to the rent of similar places near you. For when you get married and she is to have half the apartment, have a pre-agreed way to calculate a lump-sum that she needs to ...


2

A 30-yr mortgage IS a committment. So, you are willing to commit to a place, but not your long-term girlfriend??? Either you don't do this "cheap" scheme idea, or you set up as a business arrangement, or you get married. This is quite a laissez-faire statement you make... "Maybe we will eventually get married, maybe we will eventually break up, who knows."...


2

There is no issue - and no question - if you get married. The question is only relevant in the event that you go separate ways. Should that happen, you imply that you would want to refund whatever amount your girlfriend has paid toward the mortgage. The solution, then, would seem to be to exempt her from any payments, as you will either give that money ...


1

I just wanted to give you a different perspective, as I own a house (purchased with a mortgage), with my girlfriend. I think it can be done safely and fairly, but you do need to involve legal help to do it right. There really is nothing to be terrified about, the extra cost to set this up was almost irrelevant in the bigger picture of legal costs around ...


1

If you pay her rent, how do you differ from a tenant in the eyes of the law? I ask this to show that you are in a business relationship first and foremost. If you don't want to file jointly, there is nothing compelling about your situation to force it. (Grant you, in most countries, there is a benefit to filing jointly) but here, I would argue it would be ...


1

I am not a lawyer. You will want to seek legal advice here, as my response should not be relied upon. You have not yet specified a province and the rules differ from province to province, and are likely significantly different in Quebec; I think Quebec does not recognise common-law couples. The person with the savings account would not be held responsible ...


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