98

When I had this problem, I wrote the following: We do not owe you any money. If you illegally give false information regarding this alleged debt to any credit reporting agency, we will sue you for damages as provided for in federal and state law. I never heard from them again. (Note, I also included some details of when it was paid, who I talked ...


48

The first thing you should do is write a letter to the collection company telling them that you dispute all charges and demand, per section 809 of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, that they immediately validate and confirm any and all debts they allege you owe. You should further request that that they only communicate with you by mail. Section 809 ...


44

First, collect facts. From the collector: You need to "collect" (heh) the account number, doctor or provider's name, service date, amount, and contact information for the doctor and the collection agent. Hopefully, it's all on the letter and you won't need to contact them to chase it. From the doctor (the one telling you that you are paid in full) you ...


17

We can't really say if any one company is a scam or not here, but we can help you out with general practices to avoid being scammed. If you're getting calls from any debt collector, the way to find out if they are legitimate is to require them to follow the FDCPA rules. First, request that they verify the validity of the debt. Do this in your next ...


15

Money order!?? SCAM. If this was the company proper, they would be able to charge his card. It's not. Very likely, phishers and script kiddies (hardly even hackers) are trying to break into every computer system in America, and they managed to get into this company's. Or they found a PC in a dumpster or bought it at bankruptcy auction. Or a stolen ...


13

This appears to be a Dallas based collection agency using an Indian call centre to process claims. If you have no outstanding debt, you might try contacting them directly : Credence Resource Management website. If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, an email address is given for complaints. As you have noted, a google search for Credence Resource ...


10

A settlement would negatively affect your credit, because you didn't pay the bill in full. But, a settled debt looks better than an unpaid debt, so either way should help you somewhat. If you have the $800, you should pay the full amount, both for the improvement on the credit score, and because you owe the money. The problem with paying by credit card or ...


10

They have forever to collect a balance from you. Furthermore they can add whatever penalties and fees they wish to increase that balance. Worst of all, they don't have to remind you or send you bills or any other notification. You owed it when you left the office. (There very well could be local laws that require notifications, but that isn't really the ...


10

Just because the bill can't be reported doesn't mean the debt doesn't exist and isn't owed. So apart from the obvious decade of collections calls, and withholding of your medical records from the clinic, you can still be sued. While I haven't read a statute that lays out the non-reportability of medical collections, I'm sure an unpaid judgement can be ...


10

Okay you are dealing with a collection agency, and they are (generally speaking) pretty bad with things like lying, cheating, and stealing. This is what I would do if I was in your situation: Stop the Auto-Draft This is pretty important, because the auto-draft will probably be for the rest of your life if the collection agency can get away with it. They ...


9

One more thing to add. If you do decide to pay less than the full $800 to settle the debt you must insist on a letter from the original debt-holder certifying that the debt has been paid in full. Otherwise there is a good chance that another collection agency will call you later for the other $400 with no memory of the arrangement and leaving you with no ...


9

First, find out what their formal complaints process is, and then start it. The problem with just talking to customer services people is that they like to keep reassuring customers that everything will be fixed, without then doing anything to fix the problem. That's why you need a formal complaint to make them do something. If you hear from any debt ...


9

In addition to the other answers, your rights are protected in the USA by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. See https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf-0096-fair-credit-reporting-act.pdf


8

If you are an independent contractor, you are not an employee. The fact that you send invoices confirms this. You have not been receiving paycheques. This is a legal matter. Depending on the amount of money involved, you may be able to file a suit in small-claims, in which case you may be able to function without a lawyer. If the money owed exceeds the ...


7

I am sorry for your troubles. Presumably, you are feeling better which is the best possible outcome. You project that you are an honest person and desire to seek a fair outcome although you were mistreated. The insurance company should have paid a good portion of this bill. Because of this situation you will learn a valuable lesson. Namely that ...


7

I've had a few experiences similar to yours and there's a lot of it going around. Ten years ago I was fed up with Bell South and a non phone company agent offering many plans sold me on a better deal from MCI. Well, better in price until the phone and contract arrived and stated otherwise. I returned it all via UPS. End of month one, MCI billed me. I ...


6

If they had told me that I owe them $10,000 from 3 years ago, I wouldn't have anything to fight back. Why? First thing you have to do is ask for a proof. Have you received treatment? Have you signed the bill when you were done? This should include all the information about what you got and how much you agreed to pay. Do they have that to show to you, with ...


6

It may be a scam. But it also may be a company trying to find a person with the same or similar name. They may have followed a trail to her old address, and still not have the correct person. They bought number of old debts at a large discount, and are trying to track down any money they can find. It is best to ignore it, especially if they know it isn't ...


6

At first I thought this might have been for some third party negotiator. But I reviewed the letter and like the idea. To John's point, and this may kill the idea, many collection agencies buy paper by the pound. By this I mean there are debts that appear noncollectable and are sold for pennies on the dollar. The agency buys these debts in such volume they ...


6

I would also ask them to write you a letter (or sign one) in exchange for your payment that states the debt is paid in full. Then if they don't take it off you can dispute the item with the credit agencies and give them the letter as evidence. If you do this, I'd make sure the letter is on the letterhead of the original company that the debt is listed for ...


6

The letter gets your terms and conditions on the table. You should always try to negotiate with debt collectors in writing as much as possible.


6

Assuming the debt is legitimate, this does indeed constitute a delinquent account. However, this is a civil matter, not a criminal matter. This account would not constitute a criminal conviction or even a criminal act. You would be aware had you been criminally convicted. You'd have been charged by a police officer and would have had to show up in court. ...


5

Would this affect my credit in any way (other than if the collection agency reported me to the beauru) If and that's a big if, it is not reported to a beauru then no it will not affect your credit at all(I don't recommend you find out if they will report you). As for the rest of your question it's not so black and white. If they turn down your offer all ...


5

Sometimes I think a question like this is one of moral versus legal. The reality is that you know you owe the money because you received the services. You're right that the bill should have been sent to you, and the natural urge for many people is to just count it in the win column when things like this happen and there's the chance to avoid paying. I ...


5

I had this happen to me with parking ticket when I was still in school. The tickets were issued by the school police and later dismissed (because I had purchased a year-long parking pass). 3 years later I got a letter alleging that I had unpaid parking ticket. So they lost the record of dismissal. But they did not lose the record of having issued the ...


5

How could this possibly have happened? Depending on the phone company/plan, a credit check may not have even been run. You can verify this by examining your credit report (which is free and should be run by you at least once per year to look for this stuff). If they ran a check, it would show up under the inquiries. Hard inquiries remain on your report for ...


5

Engaging a debt collector to collect a debt which is still being negotiated by the consumer doesn't violate the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act or California's Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. I don't see any reason why a creditor couldn't send such a debt to a debt collector. That being said, I would suggest that you continue to negotiate ...


4

It's your business to pay what you owe but it's not your business to determine what you owe. The "Fair Debt Collections Practices act" FDCPA proscribes certain steps creditors must go through to contact you. You appear to not have received any active contact or demand, but you can still cite the FDCPA to make it their problem. Write to the creditor's ...


4

NYT has no authority to report on the credit card account. The introductory offer you accepted likely had a specified duration, like a 1 year commitment from you. It doesn't matter that you used a virtual card, or a credit card, or check or any other form of payment. NYT can, if it wants, send your NYT account to collections and/or report your delinquency ...


4

Your credit report should be a factual list of your credit records. It would be reasonable for these facts to be recorded: You were delinquent on a bill 7 years ago. It is now paid in full and current. If any other facts show up (you are still delinquent, the amount is wrong, etc.) you can dispute it with the credit bureaus and get it removed. I have ...


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