Hot answers tagged

17

Scroll down to the "Dividend and Capital Gains Distributions" section of that page on morningstar. You will see there was a distribution (i.e., payout from the fund) on 12/06/17 corresponding to the sudden drop in value. The payout resulted in a drop in capital in the fund, reflected by the loss in value. However since a distribution is paid out to the ...


15

This fund paid out a dividend of $4.177 on December 6. Any time a dividend is paid out, the price of a fund or stock should fall by the amount of the dividend, but this is not the same thing as a loss. Normally we compute returns as follows: R = (End Price + Dividend)/(Begin Price) - 1 so that the returns will not show the stock down when a dividend is ...


12

The blue and green curves have different vertical scales. One being "above" or "below" the other is just a matter of how the scales are chosen -- it's not a feature of the actual numbers being plotted. In particular, the zero point of the blue scale is 115 vertical intervals beneath the bottom horizontal line on the graph (92000÷800=115), whereas the zero ...


10

Thanks, Bob Baerker for getting me on the right track! I'd like to post my own answer. (This works for stocks or mutual funds--doesn't really matter). Go to www.marketwatch.com In the top right, click "SEARCH" Enter a symbol/ticker. Ex: "APPL" (Apple), then click the top result, as shown below: Once it opens, click the "Advanced Charting" button near the ...


10

The "fat" part of the candlestick represents the beginning and ending prices. If the end price is higher than the beginning price the stick will be colored green. If the end price is below the beginning price the stick will be colored red. Typically green sticks are hollow and red are filled in so that up and down movements can be distinguished when shown ...


9

200 period moving average means the average over the last 200 units the chart is in. So if you are looking at a weekly chart the period is weeks, if you are looking at a daily chart the period is daily, if you are looking at an hourly chart the period is hourly, etc.


9

I think you need to go back and reconsider your interpretation. First, the volume is showing you the TOTAL volume. It is showing you "How much X has been traded over period Y". The pretty green/red colours are derived data: Green = Closing Price > Opening Price Red = Closing Price < Opening Price


8

The Open - is the first traded price for the period. The High - is the highest traded price for the period. The Low - is the lowest traded price for the period. The Close - is the last traded price for the period. Any existing Bid/Ask prices remaining in the market depth have not been traded yet so can not be used to produce charts. So point (c) is your ...


7

All the crypto currencies are currently riding mostly on FOMO, as there is no other value behind them (FOMO = Fear Of Missing Out). People see that they are rising, so they are afraid of missing the big thing, so more and more get into them (which makes them rise even more, etc.) This mood is pretty much identical for nearly all of them, so they all move in ...


7

Stocks prices are determined whenever a buyer and seller agree to trade at a given price. The company (you use AAPL as an example) doesn't set its own stock price. Rather, the investors set the price every time it trades. There's no "official" price -- just the last trade. Likewise, you can offer to trade a stock at whatever price you want: that's the ...


7

There's no way that anyone could know the answer. You could have been looking at the wrong chart. You could have misread the price. Perhaps the chart was correct but your virtual trader was providing delayed quotes. It's all a guess. The only thing that can be verified is if you post a trade execution time, it can be determined what the price of the ...


6

The charts you have are 'percent change' along the Y-axis (vertical axis), and when comparing two assets, by definition, the graph starts at 0% at the date you chose to start.


6

I would love it if you could explain it with an example. Say you go to the store and buy 10 apples for $1 each. You then go to the store the next day and the price has risen to $2. How much would you expect to pay for 10 more apples? Obviously you'd pay $2 each. What you paid for apples yesterday is irrelevant. Now suppose you buy the 10 extra apples, and ...


5

These are just thinly traded securities. The flat spots are just areas of no price change. Price movements on these low volume low liquidity securities are pretty obvious because of the bid ask spread. You can see pretty obviously whether the last transaction was a buy or a sell because the price snaps to the bid or ask price then just stays there until ...


5

BigCharts will graph up to 10 symbols at once. http://bigcharts.marketwatch.com/ Enter a symbol and select "Advanced Chart" Click on "Compare To" Enter other symbols and Voila! , you have multiple pretty colored graphs. You can select various types of charts as well as different time periods.


5

Trending indicators work well in strong trending markets. They're late in and late out. They're not effective in sideways markets because they will generate many false signals and whipsaws. Oscillating indicators generate more signals and they are best used in trading markets. However, more signals means more false signals and whipsaws. The problem ...


4

It depends on the group making the chart, of course, but the most common way is to include management fees but not sales commissions and charges, for the performance of a fund. It should be stated in the chart notes. Similarly, trading commissions and spreads are usually not included when comparing stocks and bonds.


4

There are several reasons for this strong correlation: Many altcoins (Crytocurrencies other than bitcoin) are bought and sold predominantly, if not exclusively, with BTC rather than USD. Being priced in BTC, this means that when the price of BTC in USD rises and falls, the the price of the altcoin as valued in USD does the same. Even for those coins that ...


4

Remember that prices refer to discrete events in the market - trades - it is easily possible that the highest price for a trade in the next period is lower than the highest price in the current one as someone in the current period may be willing to pay more in this period than anyone in the next. The ending price of a period is also determined this way; it ...


3

First, trading stocks is inherently risky. If you would be in trouble financially should you lose everything, you should reconsider why you are trading and how much you are investing. Alright, onto your question. This Reddit post says that the dotted line is the previous close price. Every day the line will change based on what the stock closed at the day ...


3

Are you sure you're using the same date range? If you're using Max, then you're not, as ^FTMC goes back to 12/1/1985 while ^GDAXI only goes back to 11/1/1990. If I enter a custom date range of 11/1/1990 through 10/24/2015, I get: and: which, other than the dates it chose to use as labels on the x-axes, look identical. (I tried to add the URLs of the ...


3

Basis and Cobasis try to measure the scarcity of something by measuring how profitable it is to buy something now at spot price and sell it simultaneously as a future or vice versa. Definition: Basis = Future(bid) – Spot(ask) Cobasis = Spot(bid) – Future(ask) Full article: https://monetary-metals.com/basiscobasis/


3

From the Morningstar website: Total Return Expressed in percentage terms, Morningstar's calculation of total return is determined by taking the change in price, reinvesting, if applicable, all income and capital gains distributions during the period, and dividing by the starting price. Unless otherwise noted, Morningstar does not adjust total returns for ...


3

The flat peaks just mean that either no trades were made, or at least no trades were made at any price more than a penny from than the "last" one, so the "price" did not change more than a penny. given the small bid/ask spread and relatively high order sizes on both sides, it would take a lot of activity to move the price outside of the bid/ask spread. ...


3

The simple answer here is that Yahoo's data suppliers have got it wrong. It appears to have adjusted it twice and it's disturbing that such an obvious error still remains in there after almost 4 months. Yahoo show the raw data here: https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/LABD/history?p=LABD If you select Stock Splits, you'll see two of them consecutively. ...


3

Your time scales are not the same. In both charts you have "Max" selected for the time scale. However, chart 1 goes back to ~2000 and chart 2 goes back to ~2011 (these dates match the inception dates for SGENX and VOO). With different time periods it makes sense why they don't match. When I plot the exact same thing except I select 5 years as the time ...


3

Logically, a stock price should move if its earning forecast changes. If the earning forecast remains stable - i.e. the company is expected to make roughly the same amount of money going forward - then there's no reason for its stock price to move. Another factor is dividends. Some companies for various reasons prefer to return excess earnings as dividends. ...


3

Look at the various strike prices for today's TSLA expiration. The lowest ITM call with open interest is $20 and the highest ITM put with open interest is $760, with 1000s of contracts between these extreme limits and current price. If any of these were exercised (about 7% of all contracts are exercised), one would expect to see really screwed up price ...


3

Just because you buy shares does not "lock in" the price. The shares are worth whatever the market currently values them at. A stock "rising in price" intrinsically means that it now costs more to purchase, unless I'm misunderstanding your question... Say you buy two shares at $100 each. Your position is currently worth $200. The stock ...


3

This happens when there is no actual trade taking place in those "-" periods. There could be a pair of bid and ask prices, but there were no incoming Market Order or Marketable Limit Order.


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