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Yes, buying the web site is an expense. You can deduct whatever you paid for it. There is the question of whether you can expense it all in the year you bought it or whether you can or must depreciate it over time. If the price was modest you can take a section 179 deduction and deduct the whole thing in one year. (I believe the limit on section 179 is $250,...


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You will have to estimate the value based on a similar ETF that is trading frequently. eg. You have a Canadian stock index MF and you will only sell if the price is up 1% from yesterday's price. At 3:45 pm look at the price for XIC (an active cdn stock index etf) on the internet (it's 15 minutes delayed so it's actually the 3:30 pm price). If it seems ...


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The routing number for checks drawn from a Canadian bank (as Benjamin observed 9 years ago) is indeed in the format 5-dash-3 in stead of the 9 digits for U.S. banks. So you can easily find out if a check was from a U.S. or Canadian bank. Determining the currency of the check is much trickier. The "MICR" (Magnetic Ink line at bottom of check) has a "...


3

The CRA page about T2125 business expenses shows this about Line 8810 - Office Expenses: You can deduct the cost of office expenses. These include small items such as: pens pencils paper clips stationery stamps For Line 8811 - Office Stationary and Supplies, it says: You can deduct the cost of items the business used to provide ...


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You should account for everything in your local currency (that is the currency your taxes are collected in). At the end of the day you have bought those shares for 110 CAD and sold it for 126. The fact that there were currency conversion is irrelevant. And once you have done this you can use GNUCash's "View Lots..." menu to manage the sale of the stocks and ...


3

A prize is not income, in general. According to the Government of Canada, When the prize has been received as a gift, it is not included in computing income at the time of receipt. However, the recipient will be deemed to have acquired the prize at its fair market value pursuant to paragraph 69(1)(c), so that a subsequent disposition of the prize will ...


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The probability of a claim is based on any and every factor they can use -- if statistics say that people who own dogs are more likely to make a claim, they'll consider adding a question about dog ownership to the insurance application. By far the strongest indication that someone will make a claim in the future is that they've made a claim in the past. ...


2

Your net income from the rental property will effectively be taxed as additional regular income, with two important points: You can claim expenses from, for example, mortgage interest (but not the mortgage principal payments), or repairs & maintenance, etc. - this will reduce your net rental income If you pay foreign taxes in your home country (you will ...


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It depends on how much money you will make after deductions on your rental property. It is pretty straightforward if you use TurboTax - you can walk through it. Another expensive option is to have a tax preparer create your return, it will be about $1500 + to have someone submit that return for you. Also, you will need to fill out T1135 to submit to the ...


5

You're ignoring the fact that your brother derives value from living in the apartment. Fair to me in your situation would be: Split costs as before Split rent on the one unit as before. And you get the majority of the rent on one of the units, as you used to get that value by living there. I'd say it's less than 100% of the unit's rent because it's likely ...


11

“Remote” job position plus “bitcoin” = scam. I’m sorry - your best bet at this point is to block them, delete any messages and move on. If you have already given them any of your personal information then you may need to watch your credit report, and definitely change any passwords if you have given those out.


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