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2

yield is coupon / par That is the formula for current yield, which is not the yield that the WSJ reports. The yield they report is most likely the Yield to Maturity, which is the equivalent interest rate that would give you the same net return for a bond if you reinvested the coupons as they were received. In other words, at what interest rate could you ...


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An alternative bond pricing system does not account for reinvestment of coupons and therefor is an approximate system. But everything can be calculated without iteration: x / 102.03125 = (1.906 / 2) * 60 / 100 x = 58.3415 and 58.3415 + 102.03125 = (coupon/2 * 60) + 100 coupon/2 = 1.0062 coupon = 2.012 http://www.kbhscape.com/bond.htm Note that "yield&...


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tl;dr– Apparently OP invested in an index-fund with 20x leverage, and then that index-fund increased by ~2.5%, yielding ~50% profit. It sounds like you invested 200-USD in an index-fund. The index went from 4377.46 to 4486.98, which is about a ~2.5% increase. And presumably would normally correspond to a ~2.5% profit. Except, as you commented: I have ...


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The first two answers accurately explained the calculation. Your interpretation of the answer from @flux (your EDIT) is incorrect. The percent gain is: [(Current value)- (Cost) / (Cost)] (4486.98 - 4377.46)/4377.46 = 2.50% (109.52 gain) If you were to invest $200, you'd make $5. 5/200 = 2.50%


2

If the value of a stock goes up by 50% then the value of your investment also goes up by 50% as long as nothing else changed. You didn't buy more shares, you didn't sell any shares, or there were dividends. This is also true for mutual funds and ETFs. This also ignores expenses. All investments have expenses. If you invest $200 in an fund that follows the S&...


3

Let's say I open a position while the S&P 500 is at 4400 and after a few hours or days I close the position when the S&P 500 is at 4500. This would be in profit. But, would I make twice the $ profit if I open the position with $400 than if I opened it with $200? Suppose 1 unit of S&P 500 (e.g. a hypothetical S&P 500 index fund) trades at $...


1

If it is now the end of the trading day on Friday, we can calculate the SMA using the closing price on Friday, Thursday, Wednesday, Tuesday, and Monday. The total time period covered by the calculation is 4 days (Monday close to Friday close). For starters, your premise is wrong. A daily bar represents a one time period from the opening of trading to the ...


5

Because stocks don't trade on weekends. Why should the average price change between Friday and Monday be any different from the price change for any other two consecutive trading days? Most if not all markets are closed on weekends and holidays. Whatever happens on Saturday and Sunday will be acted upon once the markets open on Monday morning. For the ...


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A 3 day moving average requires three days of closing prices (which you have) for the first calculation. If the market is still open on day 4 then it's not a daily close. However, you could propose that if the market were to close at the current price of $1.35 then the 3 day SMA would involve days 2 and 3 as well as the current quote. You would then be ...


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This can only be done with a spreadsheet or a program that you would have to write, because each month has its own set of contribution rates, and the the interest earned depends on the current balance. If a smaller number of items was changing it might be possible to generate a complex formula, but the complexity of the varying rates, terms, and deposits ...


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