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6

Your $100 at t=0 will be worth $55.2 thirty years hence. Something that costs $100 today will cost 100*(1.02)^30 = $181 30 years later. So your original $100 can purchase only 100/181 worth of goods that it could purchase at t=0. So its value after 30 years is $100 * 100/181 = $55 in t=0 dollars. So it will have lost 45% of its value in 30 years.


3

It's just 1-(100/181.14) = 44.79% Lost. What remains is 100*(100/181.14) = $55.21


0

From Investopaedia Compound interest = [S (1 + i) ^ n] – S S = Principal n = number of years i = interest rate


1

You could use B = ((a + a*r + r*s)*(1 + r)^n - a)/r For example, the OP's calculation with s = 1000 and a = 100 year 3: B = s*1.1^3 + a*1.1^3 + a*1.1^2 + a*1.1 + a = 1795.10 Using the formula arrives at the same result n = 3 r = 0.10 B = ((a + a*r + r*s)*(1 + r)^n - a)/r = 1795.10 Derivation The OP requires the sum of the compounding amounts, plus s ...


1

So, their book value is $648,323,000 (correct?). Correct. If Netflix were to (hypothetically) go bankrupt immediately (considering that the numbers would be up to date and not from Dec. 31) and their assets sold & any liabilities paid, the shareholders would get only $11.711/share back. Not necessarily. You are conflating book value with liquidation ...


1

What you're looking for is the intrinsinc value of a business, which would be, strictly from a money point of view, if you buy the stock right now, how much cash would you expect back in the future? If you expect a company to run indefinitely, which we have no reason to expect Netflix won't given its current success, you can run a discounted cash flow (DCF) ...


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