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Overnight bank rates dropping to a range of 0.25% to 0.00% could tend to widen the Treasury yield-curve such that longer-term Treasuries drop in price and rise in yield. But the Fed buying of longer-term Treasuries could tend to increase the price of longer-term Treasuries which reduces their yield. The result of the moment is that Treasury Notes and Bonds ...


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I suspect we won't be able to get an authoritative answer, but here is a guess: T = treasury MU = ? BM = bond market USD = US dollar 10Y = year I'll make this a community wiki so others can update.


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I can imagine there are people selling on the secondary market at given interest rates, therefore the rate changes on the basis of those trades. No - the rate for a given bond is fixed, and is set by the entity that issued the bond (there are floating-rate bonds, but the rate is not determined by the market for that bond, but rather by some other "reference"...


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VCIT and EDV are exchange-traded funds that contain many bonds - they are not bonds in and of themselves. ETFs trade much like stocks, unlike traditional mutual funds that only trade at the end of the day. The fund managers will buy and sell bonds within this fund, so maturity is not a concern, meaning that the fund itself will not mature. When bonds that ...


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You aren't listing bonds. You are listing ETFs, ETFs that happen to invest in bonds. Roughly speaking, these trade like stocks. They each invest in a portfolio of bonds. For example, at the time of writing, VCIT invests in 1841 separate bonds. That page also gives you additional information about the distribution of bonds and other information, including the ...


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Non-qualified stated interest (NQSI) is term used for certain types of bonds that do not have level interest payments ("Contingent Debt Instruments"). IRS pub 1212 defines these terms and explains how to perform calculations but it is not easy reading. My understanding is as follows, but you need someone who knows this stuff unless you have a decent ...


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You are observing the difference between spot and par yield. Let's assume you have a bond that costs 100 EUR and pays 1 EUR every year and then 100 EUR after 10 years. Its yield (both spot and par) is 1%. Because its par value 100 EUR is the same as its market price, the spot and par yields are the same. Let's now assume that its market price rises to 110 ...


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