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19

Re: A trader when buying needs to buy at the ask price and when selling needs to sell at the bid price. So how can a trade happen 'in between' the bid and ask? Saying the trade can happen "in between" the bid & ask is simplistic. There is a time dimension to the market. It's more accurate to say that an order can be placed "in between" the ...


12

I don't know how many people "a ton" is, but if you are getting more than, say, 6 people who are qualified to rent, you've priced it too low. Better to ask for $1200, and have a potential tenant haggle or ask you to reduce the price than to have 6 people want it for $900. It's worth it to run a credit report, and let that help you choose. I agree with ...


8

I wouldn't start a bidding war if I were you. Sometimes you may get potentially bad tenants who cannot find a property anywhere else offering more money just to get in a place. If you know nothing else about these people how can you guarantee they will keep paying the rent once they get in. The things you should be doing is checking the prospective tenant's ...


7

I found this puzzling also at first. But after reviewing many past successful and unsuccessful ebay auctions, I came to this conclusion: Keeping the reserve price a secret is all about the psychology of people. Many people are hesitant to be the first bidder. But, if they can bid very low, they are more likely to bid. Some are afraid that they will be a ...


6

All the time. For high volume stocks, it may be tough to see exactly what's going on, e.g. the bid/ask may be moving faster than your connection to the broker can show you. What I've observed is with options. The volume on some options is measured in the 10's or 100's of contracts in a day. I'll see a case where it's $1.80/$2.00 bid/ask, and by offering $1....


6

Bid = 38.99 x 6800 Someone wants to buy 6800 shares at $38.99 each. Ask = 39.00 x 4300 Someone wants to sell 4300 shares at $39.00 each. When someone's bid price matches someone's ask price, you've got a transaction.


4

I can think of the following situations in which one could see a trade occur between the visible best bid & offer: 1) on a public exchange, people have posted hidden limit orders with either bid prices above the best visible bid or offers below the best visible offer, and incoming orders have executed against this hidden liquidity[1]; 2) some orders ...


3

The Level 2 data is simply showing the depth of the market. If I am trading shares with my broker I have the option of viewing only the top 10 bid/ask prices in the depth or all of the data (which sometimes can be a very long list). With another broker I get the top ten bid and ask prices and how many orders are available for each price level, or I have the ...


1

Yes. Your demand for shares reduces the quantity supplied at the ask price. If you purchase all of the shares supplied at that price, the next share purchased will have to be at a higher price unless a new seller comes online.


1

I'm surprised by all these complicated answers. Yes @Victor, you can create a form that asks people to put down their financial information but you want to be careful and not put off potential tenants by asking for too many details. Depending on the OP's typical tenants, an extensive background and credit check may not be necessary. For example, if I have ...


1

My broker collates the order book by price and marketplace, displaying the number of shares available at each level, sorted as in Victor's screencap. You can glean information from not just a snapshot of the order book but also by watching how it changes over time. Although it's not always a complete picture -- many brokers hold limit orders internally until ...


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