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72

There are several possibilities: The Amazon seller wants a bigger profit than the E-Bay seller. The Amazon seller has higher costs than the E-Bay seller. This can be a more expensive source, or higher overhead costs. The items are not really the same, for example the E-Bay items could be old stock, damaged, used, grey imports without warranty or even fake. ...


33

Look carefully at shipping charges. When I've seen "prices" that were much lower than comparable products they've often been accompanied by sky-high shipping prices; a $20 item with a shipping cost of $80 adds up to the same $100 as a $90 item with a shipping cost of $10.


20

Generally one of two cases. But I'll briefly mention a third: Go-backs. When you return an item, well for any reason, they don't bother noting the reason, and if the reason is "defective" they do not take a swing at fixing it. They throw it in a bin with all other go-backs, and auction off the bin. People buy these bins and resell the items on eBay. ...


18

Your best bet is to pay for title insurance. If you do the same search as the title company, you'll probably find (and miss) the same things they would. By letting a title company do the search and paying for their title insurance, you're covered in case something else surfaces. In a case like this you should be getting a good enough discount, don't take the ...


18

You're not responsible for the mortgages on the property - those are agreements between the lender and the borrower. The risk you have is that the title search missed something. If the seller (i.e., the bank or banks who foreclosed) did not have full rights to sell the property, and there was another party who had a lien on the property or had an interest ...


11

A possibility may be that you're dealing with drop shipping. Sometimes this also happens on Amazon. Usually, if an item is sold on Amazon and ships from the US (or your country), this means that someone has taken on the cost and logistics of having the item shipped to them, warehousing it, and shipping it on to the buyer from somewhere in proximity to ...


9

Without providing a specific example, I can only give a generalised answer with some possible reasons: While Ebay does have buy-it-now products, predominantly it is an auction with lower starting prices, and therefore items may often not reach the sale price or RRP. Ebay includes second-hand items, and people forward-selling unwanted brand new items that ...


5

No, if you purchase it with all taxes and leins dismissed, in Pa, it usually goes up for sale 3 times before they drop all leins and taxes. Before you purchase the house, check eith sheriff and make sure they are selling with the above dismissed, otherwise, you can get youself in a real mess.


5

The goal is to persuade potential buyers to make their best offer immediately, since they know that if they try to go cheap someone is likely to outbid them. In a hot market, with an attractive property, this can actually work fairly well for the seller, especially if they need the sale to go through relatively quickly. Remember that until the sale, the ...


5

Its a trick so that you don't feel like you're spending money when you bid since the bids are in credits, not dollar amounts. This is especially true when there is not direct one to one match with a dollar and credit (1 credit might actually be 3 cents)


5

For the sake of putting in an answer, Interestingly, real estate sales paradigms are culturally and regionally driven; you can't, really, deviate from those. For example, in Sydney Australia, it's totally and completely normal to auction a house for sale. In other markets, the practice is totally unknown, and if you did (somehow, the mechanism barely ...


4

I've done this in AZ. It's important to know which lender is foreclosing, because if it's not the most senior one, then your purchase can later be foreclosed. A foreclosure extinguishes all junior interests, but can itself be extinguished by a more senior interest. I may not have the correct terms here but you get the idea. You should also check to be sure ...


3

You can call the county tax assessor's office if you're looking for tax foreclosures and auctions of that nature. You need to have cash in hand or proof of funds in order to participate, and you usually get very little time (or none at all sometimes) to look at the properties before bidding. It's a very competitive market, but if you work at it hard enough ...


3

You should really ask a local attorney/RE agent, but generally HOA and RE taxes are attached to the property. If the trustee sale is by the mortgage bank, then it is likely that at closing they will require you to pay the prorated portion of the HOA fees and the taxes. I bought a foreclosed home once directly from a bank, not through a trustee auction sale, ...


2

The sellers can definitely lose because an open auction might result in a higher final price. Or it might not. In an open auction the seller will get slightly more than the 2nd highest bidder is willing to pay. That is unlikely to be the most the highest bidder is willing to pay. Blind auctions are an attempt to get each bidder to offer their genuine ...


2

For accounting purposes, consider the costs of acquisition as part of the cost of the asset as opposed to expensing. This will be important to consider if you need to amortise the asset for reporting or tax purposes. Dr. Land $250,000 Dr. Building: $250,000 Cr. Cash $500,000 The acquisition of the land from previous owners. And Dr. ...


2

I have flipped houses for years and have gone through every auction process imaginable plus worked for an auction house. Blind auctions are used when there is a very finite group of buyers. Or in some cases you know exactly who the buyers are and the buyers might also know each other. A traditional auction is used when you have a property in normal ...


2

Marketplace sites (including both ebay and Amazon) are full of sellers selling questionable merchandise. Sometimes it is counterfiet. Sometimes it is last years model. Sometimes it is a "grey import" of a product intended for a different country. Sometimes it is a used product advertised as new. The difference between eBay and Amazon is that while both ...


2

One other possibility that I haven't seen mentioned is that most sellers have a 'manufacturer's suggested retail price' (MSRP) associated with each product. Retailers will have deals with the manufacturer where they cannot sell at less than that price unless they negotiate an exemption. What the retailers pay for those goods is typically much less than ...


1

Technically, at least given the terminology used in game theory, both are "auctions". What you probably think of a "standard" auction is known in academic circles as an "English auction". If by "tender", you mean sealed envelopes where the highest price is accepted, that is a sealed first-price auction. If the second-place bid is accepted, then that is a ...


1

It's hard to say if this will result in a higher or lower sale price. I presume the reasoning behind a closed bid auction is that one potential buyer may be willing to spend significantly more than others. Suppose you looked at a property and decided that you were willing to pay, say, $200,000 for it. They hold a conventional, open bid auction. Someone else ...


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