New answers tagged

1

You need consent if you take (and publish) photographs of people for non-strictly-private purposes, or you are in violation of PIPEDA. You may not trespass when taking photographs of private property (but you may otherwise take photos). You may not violate copyright law of public performances and the like (such as, record a video of the movie in a cinema). ...


0

Going around verifying whether supposedly-extant Bitcoin ATMs in public places are actually present and apparently functional is not in and of itself illegal activity. Some of these machines may not be in public places (for example, they may be in privately-owned stores or malls). In those cases, you would have to make sure that what you want to do is in ...


24

I think it's a simpler scam And I'm sure of that because they want Bitcoin ATMs specifically. Scams work in small steps. Right now, the instruction is to go out and take photos of the ATM machines and gather data. They have no real interest in the data; it's just busy-work to build up your confidence. Later, the instruction will be to deposit cash into ...


5

The answers stating that this is a bad idea or a scam might be missing something. In the UK "secret shopping" is a legitimate thing and many companies rely on it to get feedback on the services they supply or gather market info etc. It may or may not be normal in Canada. If I found this task on a secret shopper portal I wouldn't be alarmed. An app provider ...


1

Most ATM's in Australia only dispense $20 and $50 notes. However, I have noticed the ANZ 'Smart ATM' at my local branch, which was replaced in November, has an ad attached to it informing the user that it now dispenses the whole range of notes. I am in Perth but it seems to be the case in Sydney as well. As @Tim Malone has suggested, it would be a lot easier ...


63

In addition to skimmers, another reason to have photos like this is that some ATMs are poorly secured. A surprisingly common type of theft is to steal the whole ATM. Banks are poor targets as their external ATMs are typically big and bulky. ATMs in stores, however, are often small and only bolted down. Stealing the whole machine can net you thousands of ...


140

Legal? Maybe. Legitimate? Absolutely Not. I'm not qualified to guess whether documenting the make, model and location of ATMs is technically legal in your jurisdiction. A list like that isn't something I would want found in my possession during a police search though. However, I can say without a doubt: This information is not being gathered for legitimate ...


1

What is generally stored in the mag stripe and also from what I know in the EMV is the pin offset, not the actual pin. The pin offset is a pointer to the actual value of the pin on the banking accounting server. The offset effectively is the memory address of the person's PIN. Done that way, they can change your pin at any moment, and it has no effect on ...


27

The EMV standard supports two (technically three) methods of verifying a PIN. In the first method ("online"), the PIN is encrypted and sent to the bank for verification. The other method ("offline") asks the chip to verify the PIN, and only the result is transmitted to the bank. (Offline is further subdivided into "encrypted" and "plaintext", depending on ...


3

The bank may charge fees if the balance drops below a certain threshold, and may may close the account if the balance stays at $0 for too long. In general you don't want to allow your checking account to drop close to $0 because of the potential for overdraft fees or declined payments from an auto-scheduled payment or if someone tries to cash a check you ...


7

YMMV, but my bank (Chase) auto-closed an account after seeing it sit empty for 90 days. Since you refill it every 30ish days, that won't be a problem. It would certainly be a problem over the summer, though (presuming he doesn't take summer term classes, or have a local internship), but $25 then would solve that problem. Still, I'd counsel my child to ...


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