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This tag is to be used for any questions related to Stocks. Ideally they should be accompanied by a country tag if relevant. It is discouraged to ask question about a specific stock. However an example can be used to illustrate a point.

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This is an interesting question that may actually be better suited to Quant.SE. First of all, stock prices are random variables, or, to be more precise, stochastic processes (a time-ordered string of …
answered Nov 29 '11 by Tal Fishman
5
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ES1 is the Bloomberg symbol for the CME E-mini S&P 500 front-month continuous contract. ES2, ES3, etc. will likewise yield the 2nd and 3rd months. Which exact futures contract this symbol refers to …
answered Sep 4 '11 by Tal Fishman
3
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. A stock transaction can be executed in milliseconds, whereas real estate transactions typically take months. Thus today's behavior is a much better indicator of future price behavior for real estate than for stocks. …
answered Nov 29 '11 by Tal Fishman
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The fact that dividends grow in perpetuity does not prevent one from calculating duration. In fact, many academic papers look at exactly this problem, such as Lewin and Satchell. This Wilmott thread …
answered Jan 3 '12 by Tal Fishman
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What you are proposing is called a "covered call" strategy. It is a perfectly reasonable speculative play on how far the stock will move within a certain amount of time. If your belief that the stoc …
answered Sep 25 '11 by Tal Fishman
19
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Yes, the stock price drops on the ex-dividend date by roughly the amount of the dividend. There is even academic research testing this and confirming that the popular rule of thumb works well.
answered Sep 28 '11 by Tal Fishman
2
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Most national banks are required by the regulations of their host countries to hold significant reserves in the form of government debt. A default would likely wipe out their capital and your common s …
answered Sep 27 '11 by Tal Fishman
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These days almost all risky assets move together, so the most difficult criterion to match from your 4 will be "not strongly correlated to the U.S. economy." However, depending on how you define "str …
answered Sep 9 '11 by Tal Fishman
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Historically and theoretically, junk bonds and large cap stocks (e.g., S&P 500) have about the same risk and returns, with stocks probably outperforming over sufficiently long horizons. Although a … strongly correlated. There is not much diversification value. You will get much better diversification mixing stocks with investment grade bonds. Check with your tax accountant for your personal …
answered Aug 31 '11 by Tal Fishman