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Results tagged with Search options user 3983

For questions that relate to the laws, practices, and products of the United States.

0
votes
Your question is not a financial one, it's a legal one. The only legal option is to file the tax returns you were legally obligated to file. If you live in a country with a tax treaty with the U.S., t …
answered Sep 7 '14 by ChrisInEdmonton
1
vote
No. However, there is a concept of co-signing loans. For example, many first-time home-buyers are unable to qualify for a mortgage, but often a parent is willing to co-sign. That means the bank think …
answered Jul 2 '18 by ChrisInEdmonton
6
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When I granted someone power of attorney to one of my bank accounts, both of us went in to the bank with no documentation, and just signed some forms that the bank had. I suggest you and your mother g …
answered Sep 14 '11 by ChrisInEdmonton
0
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As a US citizen, you are legally required to file tax returns each year, even if you do not live in the U.S. and even if you earn no money in the U.S. Your tax returns will have your SSN on them, and …
answered Sep 7 '14 by ChrisInEdmonton
6
votes
If she is a U.S. citizen, she needs to worry about U.S. taxes regardless of whether or not she is living in the U.S. She must file a tax return even if she spends 0 days in the U.S., and must pay U.S. …
answered Jan 18 '12 by ChrisInEdmonton
23
votes
Well, your exchange rate changes are deeply unrealistic. But aside from that, there's another problem. You are assuming in step 3 that the exchange rate will return to the same position as it was in s …
answered Jul 29 '18 by ChrisInEdmonton
9
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This is a legal question, really. If the bill was in her name and if they had no agreement about this, it's fairly clear-cut that it is the ex-girlfriend's responsibility. Small claims court general …
answered Apr 4 '16 by ChrisInEdmonton
4
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In my case, I was able to find out by asking the bank that held the mortgage. I had to go down in person and bring all the paperwork I had available. They were able to give me this information within …
answered Oct 1 '12 by ChrisInEdmonton
3
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You would use a regular trading account for such investments. You then pay tax on any capital gains. There are a number of options for what to hold inside of such accounts, just as there are for Roth …
answered Apr 5 '13 by ChrisInEdmonton
6
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Assuming the debt is legitimate, this does indeed constitute a delinquent account. However, this is a civil matter, not a criminal matter. This account would not constitute a criminal conviction or ev …
answered Dec 17 '11 by ChrisInEdmonton
1
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Your boyfriend must report all income from the U.S. to the Canada Revenue Agency, and must do so in Canadian currency. This is because he lives in Canada. If he has failed to report this for tax years …
answered Jan 25 '19 by ChrisInEdmonton
4
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A breach of a legal agreement (such as a lease agreement) is indeed illegal. This is generally handled by civil law, not criminal law. Likely, the lease agreement states that your lease can be termina …
answered Apr 17 '15 by ChrisInEdmonton
2
votes
Two obvious options are to use a regular cheque or pay by credit card. A cheque (or "check" in US spelling) will typically not have any fee. Not all vendors will accept cheques, of course, but many w …
answered Jul 18 '18 by ChrisInEdmonton
11
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One of the main tax loopholes more readily available to the wealthy in the U.S. is the fact that long-term capital gains are taxed at a much lower rate. Certainly, people making less than $250,000/yea …
answered Nov 29 '12 by ChrisInEdmonton
1
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In most jurisdictions, you want to split the transactions. Why? Because you want to report capital gains on your investment income, and this will almost always be taxed at a lower rate than employment …
answered Aug 4 '11 by ChrisInEdmonton

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