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A generic tag to understand the calculations in a specific case. Please give out a sample illustration and ask a specific question. Ideally should also be accompanied by specific subject tags like "credit-cards", "savings-account", "index-funds" etc.

4
votes
The problem is that your source equation is wrong, and poorly written as well. Let's dissect how bad it is (here's a snip from the web-site) . First, the sloppiness. Algebraic symbols should not h …
answered Aug 13 '15 by DJohnM
1
vote
You start with $37500, divided into four piles. Each pile grows by a certain amount over a year; for example the second pile grows by 15.4% of 7800, or 1201.20 What is the total growth in all four …
answered Oct 19 '16 by DJohnM
3
votes
You can do it this way: First, calculate the value, at the time of Payment #77, of the principal amount, ignoring all the payments. So it would just be, in your example, 100000 X (1 + 0.05/12)^77. …
answered Mar 19 '16 by DJohnM
4
votes
In addition to the correct answer of Aganju, it should be noted that one or both of these conversion factors has been rounded off, lessening the accuracy of the results. If the factor of 1.32 is exac …
answered Jul 29 '17 by DJohnM
0
votes
There is no simple way to calculate the monthly payment with allowance being made for the different number of days in individual months. Because the payments are not made at regular intervals (in ter …
answered Aug 1 '14 by DJohnM
2
votes
But how do I bring the initial deposit into the equation? Basically, you can't. Unless you combine two different formulas from Math of Finance into a single expression. The single initial depos …
answered Mar 27 '16 by DJohnM
2
votes
Another, perhaps simpler way to look at and calculate the result. Find the future value, at the time of the last payment, of 4 ordinary annuities, all with identical payments of $10 each, and an inte …
answered Feb 11 '14 by DJohnM
5
votes
Each month, the lender adds the month's interest to the outstanding balance and then subtracts the payment received. In this case, the lender adds an extra charge, still proportional to the outstand …
answered Mar 3 '14 by DJohnM
5
votes
Here's the way I think you should analyze it: The car costs $22500. That's the cash price if you walk into the dealership and plunk down 225 $100 bills, and that's what YCars is charging you. XC …
answered Dec 13 '13 by DJohnM
1
vote
For this type of problem, it is often easier to convert from one rate to another through a third standard interest rate. One good candidate for this intermediate rate is what, here in Canada, is call …
answered Aug 24 '18 by DJohnM
12
votes
Yes. It does cost the same to pay off a "15 year in 15" year versus a "30 year in 15 year" mortgage. After all, the 30 year amortization period is only used by the lender to calculate the monthly pa …
answered Jan 13 '15 by DJohnM
2
votes
The idea is correct; the details are a little off. You need to apply it to the actual cash flow the bond would create. The best advice I can give you is to draw a time-line diagram. Then you would s …
answered May 3 '16 by DJohnM
2
votes
To use a formula you must do two things: find the interest rate to apply to the formula, and fit the specifics of the problem to the formula you want to use. WRT the interest rate, you quote an annu …
answered Sep 5 '14 by DJohnM
0
votes
Edited to incorporate the comments elsewhere of @Atkins Assuming, (apparently incorrectly) that duration is time to maturity: First, note that the question does not mention the coupon rate, the size …
answered Apr 6 '16 by DJohnM
2
votes
Assuming that the original amount is C . Then, by the time of the Nth payment this original debt will have grown by compound interest. the new value will be : New Principal = C x (1+i)^n Of course, …
answered Oct 4 '16 by DJohnM

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