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From time to time, a business overcharges me (e.g., a medical provider tries to make me pay twice the same bill with a few months of interval).

Since I keep track of my expenditures, I can typically detect and prove that the charge is incorrect, and the business ends up correcting their "mistake", either immediately or after a few months of back and forth with the corresponding customer/billing service.

This is annoying. Is there anything can I do after a business overcharged me and corrected their "mistake"? E.g., financial compensation (because I spent time on it and I may have been overcharged if I hadn't checked), or formal complain (because I suspect some businesses to be more or less intentionally making charge "mistakes").

I spend most of my time in the United States, and so I mostly interested in what could be done, if anything, in the United States. I have a special interest in medical providers as in practice most of the issues with businesses are with medical businesses.

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    And you are due financial compensation because the overcharging is 'annoying' ? They corrected their mistake and no agency will chastise the business for human error. Without proof that a business is systematically overcharging patients/customers, it's spitting in the wind. Jun 18, 2018 at 21:47
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    I don't go there anymore, and tell my friends. I agree, I have also the impression that some businesses intentionally make such 'errors'.
    – Aganju
    Jun 19, 2018 at 3:02
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    @BobBaerker quoting the question details "financial compensation (because I spent time on it and I may have been overcharged if I hadn't checked)". Jun 19, 2018 at 3:27
  • @BobBaerker "Without proof that a business is systematically overcharging patients/customers, it's spitting in the wind" -> One of the actions that could be done after a business overcharged someone and corrected their "mistake" would be to report it to some agency in charge of identifying business that systematically overcharges patients/customers, as we can do with HIPAA violations. Doing nothing validates their business strategy. Jun 29, 2018 at 2:56
  • @Franck Dernoncourt - You're actually equating a corrected billing overcharge with a HIPAA violation (violation of health information privacy rights)? As per your original question, you stated that you found it annoying that you had to spend time on correcting an overcharge and you want a regulatory agency to lodge a complaint with. Perhaps keeping a lawyer on retainer would be more time efficient and expeditious for you? Jun 29, 2018 at 12:38

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There is nothing you can do after they corrected their mistake.

If it happens again, however, you can report them for fraud because they sent you a bill without having a basis for their claim.
They likely won't get into too much trouble (or any), but at least there's a paper trail if the company actually tries to defraud many other people.

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  • Thanks. "you can report them for fraud" -> to whom? Jun 19, 2018 at 1:55
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    @FranckDernoncourt: At the federal level, the FTC has jurisdiction over unfair business practices including fraud. At the state level, the Attorney General's office would be a good first contact; check if your state has a "Consumer Protection Division" or similar.
    – Ben Voigt
    Jun 19, 2018 at 3:22

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