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https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/FMAGX?p=FMAGX

Here the asset price highlighted is 110.36. Is this price an average of the individual asset prices the fund is comprised of ?

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If not an average how is value 110.36 calculated ?

Is this the nav price ?

"Net Asset Value

The easiest way to find out the price of a mutual fund is to look at its net asset value. NAV is the total value of a mutual fund's assets, less all of its liabilities. Many mutual funds use this number to determine the price for transacting units of the fund. When you buy and sell mutual funds, you typically do so at the NAV."

src : https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/03/090503.asp

  • It can't be what we think of as "the average" as we think of it from middle school math class. Since you're buying bits of each stock (or bond), there's probably some formula for dividing up the $110.36 into the distinct components. – RonJohn Feb 3 '18 at 20:46
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    According to the Yahoo page, this fund currently has $16.96 billion of net assets, where "net assets" is the total value of all of the funds investments and cash at hand, less any liabilities. If you divide 16.96bn by the total number of shares outstanding in the fund, then you will get the 110.36 "asset price" (current share price). – Nick R Feb 3 '18 at 21:41
  • @NickR where do you find the total of outstanding shares? Google is failing me on this. – RonJohn Feb 3 '18 at 21:58
  • @RonJohn I had a quick look at the Fidelity site, but they do not appear to publish this number. fundresearch.fidelity.com/mutual-funds/summary/316184100 – Nick R Feb 3 '18 at 22:06
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    If an open end mutual fund is not restricted on share issuance, the number of outstanding shares will fluctuate. If NAV equals net assets divided by shares, since you know two of the 3 variables then you can calculate the number of outstanding shares for the date of the reported NAV. – Bob Baerker Feb 3 '18 at 22:29

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