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My ex boyfriend and I bought a house as tenants in common more than a decade ago. Due to his abuse I left the house in 2002.

After 10 years of trying to force the sell or buy me out, in 2012 he did, I signed over my portion of the deed to him. At that point I did not realize I was still on mortgage agreement as co-signer.

Recently I received a call from the mortgage lender demanding I bring the mortgage account current. I ran my credit report and there was the mortgage history, 46 times 30 day late payments and 17 times 60 day late payments.

My credit score reflects his late payments.

Thus he is ruining my credit. I though when he bought me out in 2012 I am off the mortgage, but looks like I'm still on the mortgage.

How do i REMEDY this?

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    I am a bit confused on your view that he is ruining your credit. As a cosigner on the loan, you were equally responsible to make the payments. Did you make them? If you didn't then you are the one ruining your credit. As @AakashM said, seek advice of a lawyer. – Pete B. Jan 16 '18 at 12:30
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    You need to see a lawyer. You may have violated the terms of your mortgage by selling your interest in the house without paying it off. This might make your attempt to transfer your interest void, giving you back an interest in the house. You might have a case for fraud against your ex boyfiend. But you need a lawyer. Now. – David Schwartz Jan 16 '18 at 12:41
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    @PeteB. Clearly she expected that all her responsibility for the house was bought out along with her interest in the house in 2012. Naive perhaps, but confusing? – Brian Jan 17 '18 at 16:44
  • @PeteB. I agree with Brian. She thought she was bought out of the house. I agree with you and AakashM that she should have involved a lawyer in 2012. You are also right that she agreed to be responsible for the mortage, and thus should be responsible for the payments if her co-signer is not. – Xalorous Jan 18 '18 at 17:05
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I ran my credit report and there was the mortgage history, 46 times 30 day late payments and 17 times 60 day late payments.

[...]

How do i REMEDY this?

Although you have posed a question about how to remedy your credit, the answer really has to go to the broader context, and that broader context means you need a lawyer.

in 2012 [...] I signed over my portion of the deed to him.

Ideally, you need a lawyer with a time machine, because whatever you signed in 2012 really wanted to have a lawyer look at it - but there aren't any of those, so you'll have to hope that the lawyer you engage now (right now) can still do something useful.

As has been mentioned in comments, as well as the issue of your credit, you also potentially have issues with the mortgage lender and perhaps also with the taxman, depending on what the rules are in your jurisdiction about tax on property sales.

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