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Can you get a charge back for a service if you already signed a contract that you would pay for it and paid in full. The contract is misleading i.e. giving details in fine print in the sense that you will likely get fooled if you just glance over it but it is telling the truth if you read it carefully. But the service itself is a ripoff.

What are the chances of getting a successful charge back on credit card? Assuming that the service provider will not give a refund willingly.

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    You cannot simply ask for a charge back on the grounds that you don't like the deal after you have voluntarily signed it. Unless you can show clear fraud or substantial bad faith, those will not work well with chargebacks. They will almost certainly always refer you back to the merchant. Chargebacks are for things you didn't authorize, things that were overcharged/under refunded, and actual service interruptions and/or not fully received what you paid for. Beyond that, chargebacks will rarely work in your favor, specially if they can show you signed a contract. – GµårÐïåñ Dec 21 '17 at 22:10
  • @GµårÐïåñ what about a friend that recommended such crappy service to you, would you still consider them a friend? – bakalolo Dec 21 '17 at 22:11
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    @GµårÐïåñ That would be a great answer if you had posted it as an answer. – Ben Miller - Reinstate Monica Dec 21 '17 at 22:18
  • Have you tried to work things out with the merchant first? – David Schwartz Dec 22 '17 at 0:34
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    @bakalolo this is not about evaluating your friends, that is a choice you need to make, this is about a legal procedure that take into consideration nothing about the quality of your friends, I'm sorry. – GµårÐïåñ Dec 23 '17 at 5:27
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Can? Yes. Legally/May? No.

Charge back is when you indicate that the credit card charge itself is fraudulent. That could be a charge made by someone not authorized to use your credit card, or a vendor double charging you or charging you for an amount you did not agree to. It is not something you can do simply because you're unhappy with the goods or service rendered.

If you are unhappy with the goods or service, it is up to you to work that out with the vendor. Some cards do offer purchase protection or similar as part of the card's additional services, but this is not a charge back; it's more of an insurance claim, really. Check with your card issuer and your cardholder's agreement to see if they offer this sort of protection.

If you feel that a vendor is fraudulently advertising their services, you may be able to take that up with various governmental agencies, including potentially the state attorney general (United States) or consumer protection bureau.

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It is difficult to answer this question for your particular case as there are quite a few factors that can affect the answer, including how much time has elapsed since the charge was made and the company's policy regarding refunds. Even the number of other customers that are complaining and/or disputing charges can affect the outcome.

In general, most companies will issue a refund if you simply request it from them and explain why you are dissatisfied with their service. I always recommend everyone attempt this method first since it is the simplest and fastest solution. If you try that and they ignore you, or refuse to refund, then you can try a chargeback with the CC. Typically when that happens the credit card issuer will request documentation from you, and whether or not the chargeback is successful greatly depends on whether the merchant chooses to fight it. Many companies don't respond to the CC inquiry and typically the "judgement" is ruled in the purchaser's favor. If the merchant chooses to fight it though, the contract you signed is certainly going to be considered by the arbiter. IMHO fair arbitration would consider what the service is, what the merchant's cost to provide the service is, and how difficult the contract is to understand, but I can't promise that CC arbitration works that way.

In my personal experience with providing a service and accepting CC as payment, I have never disputed a chargeback, even though I'm fairly certain I could win if I elected to fight it. My reasoning for not disputing it is simply that I want all of my customers to be happy, and if they aren't for some reason, then I feel a refund is fair.

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You cannot simply ask for a charge back on the grounds that you don't like the deal after you have voluntarily signed it. Unless you can show clear fraud or substantial bad faith, those will not work well with chargebacks. They will almost certainly always refer you back to the merchant. Chargebacks are for things you didn't authorize, things that were overcharged/under refunded, and actual service interruptions and/or not fully received what you paid for. Beyond that, chargebacks will rarely work in your favor, specially if they can show you signed a contract.

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