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I'm not too familiar with futures. I think it's where people bet on where a stock (or other instrument) will go (either up or down).

I'm wondering, is there a way for me to see for example for a certain stock, let's say AAPL for example. Can I tell from these futures how many people thinks it's going to go up vs down? for example, let's say 100 people think it'll go up, while 20 think it'll go down. Then couldn't I use this information to assess that aapl may go up. (since 80% of people think so).

If so, where do I find this information? Like is there a futures website or something that tells me this.

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Can I tell from these futures how many people thinks it's going to go up vs down?

No - there is no reason for the price of an single-stock equity futures contract to be anything other than the future value (in time-value-of-money terms) of the current stock price (i.e. P * E^(rt)).

Otherwise, there would be an arbitrage opportunity - if futures were priced higher then the future value of the stock, you could buy stock now and sell the futures contract. Since they would move together (a $1 increase in the stock would cause a $1 increase in the futures value), you'd have risk-free profit. If the futures were priced below the stock, you could buy the futures contract and short the stock to get the same effect.

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    This is the right answer - there are many similar questions on this site where someone unknowingly hints that what they've stumbled onto is some type of arbitrage opportunity (without really understanding what that is or means). If an amateur investor believes they have found a situation that could be described as 'arbitrage', the most likely explanation is that there is a hidden piece of the puzzle they are unaware of. Likewise, an assumption that such arbitrage opportunities exist only for seconds in the market can help guide expectations for things like the futures price vs current price. – Grade 'Eh' Bacon Jan 16 '18 at 17:18
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As in the stock market, if a futures trade is recorded then there will always be a buyer and a seller. Put in your words, one side thinks it'll go up (or they wouldn't have bought the contract) and the other side thinks it'll go down (or why else would they have sold).

With that in mind I think the information you're looking for does not exist.

Edit:
Factoring in closing trades you could state the side that bought doesn't think it's going down any further. The side that sold doesn't think it's going up any further.

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I'm not too familiar with futures. I think it's where people bet on where a stock (or other instrument) will go (either up or down).

Futures in entering into a contract to buy [or sell] an item [stock/commodity/index/etc] at a specified rate at a specified date in future. Generally exchange govern when the futures close. These are generally set for a specified date; i.e. Every Thursday / last Thursday of month etc.

I'm wondering, is there a way for me to see for example for a certain stock, let's say AAPL for example.

AAPL may be incorrect example. As much as I understand in US futures is allowed only on commodities and energy companies.

Can I tell from these futures how many people thinks it's going to go up vs down? for example, let's say 100 people think it'll go up, while 20 think it'll go down. Then couldn't I use this information to assess that aapl may go up. (since 80% of people think so).

Generally the futures and current price more in tandem. If the future goes up, it gives an arbitrage and hence the current price corrects immediately and the arbitrage vanishes. Hence there is very less opportunity.

If so, where do I find this information?

Most futures are traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.

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Technically the current price includes the average belief in value. The value of a stock should be the discounted value of all future dividends. The price is the market's evaluation of that. Futures can be seen as a way to gamble on the movement alone, rather than the total price. Just like betting on a horse rather than owning it and entering it in the race. It magnifies winnings- and losses.

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