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So, I need to raise my income slightly to hit the minimum income for the Obamacare premium tax credit. Do any of these count for income?

  • I sell broken cell phones I bought off eBay (fixed, of course.)
  • I hold some savings bonds which are several years old.
  • I have some royalties from designs/edits I did for posters, that have not yet been paid to me (but can be.)
  • I offer culinary services to people within my family (special diets), and am reimbursed for this.
  • "that have not yet been paid to me (but can be.)" Why the heck haven't they??? – RonJohn Dec 6 '17 at 1:36
  • @RonJohn To answer your question, this exists on one of those print-on-demand websites... say, design a T-shirt, then it is manufactured AFTER ordering. Basically, I elected to be paid with checks rather than direct deposit, and I can order these checks at will – user1833028 Dec 6 '17 at 5:51
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I sell broken cell phones I bought off eBay (fixed, of course.)

Counts, but there may be a minimum amount before they are tracked.

I hold some savings bonds which are several years old.

The interest counts. The principal does not. You may not have to include them until you sell.

I have some royalties from designs/edits I did for posters, that have not yet been paid to me (but can be.)

Counts. Under some circumstances, they might not count until you get paid. As a practical matter, they count if the payer sends you a tax form.

I offer culinary services to people within my family (special diets), and am reimbursed for this.

Counts. Although if your relatives don't send you tax forms, it is unlikely that anyone will ever talk to you about this. Again, this may have a minimum amount under which it doesn't get tracked.

Legally though you are required to pay income tax on money you receive in exchange for services. That it's your family doesn't matter. If you file this once and then stop, the IRS may ask you if you're still doing it. So this could cause an audit.

If you offer culinary services to your family for free and your family happens to give you money, that doesn't require tax unless it exceeds the $14,000 gift tax exemption per giver and the lifetime estate exemption of that giver. The estate exemption is per giver while the gift exemption is per giver/recipient combination. And it would be the payer who is supposed to pay gift tax, not you. So it wouldn't count for Obamacare purposes.

The official list of what does and does not count. Note that this is basically anything where you pay income tax plus a couple things where you don't. All your examples are taxable and Obamacare income.

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