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My husband has a credit card (under his name - the account was not opened jointly).

He had the bank issue an extra card in my name. However, I never signed any documents to become the account owner.

Does that automatically add my name to the credit account?

More importantly, does that make me liable for the debt on that credit account as far as credit card company is concerned?

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    Which state are you in? – Ben Miller Aug 4 '17 at 3:02
  • @BenMiller: Does it matter? It sounds like OP is an authorized user of the credit card account. Everything I've read suggests that authorized users are never liable for the debt, and I've never heard of any particular states having exceptions to this. – Nate Eldredge Aug 4 '17 at 3:23
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    @NateEldredge Generally in community property states, debts are automatically taken on by both spouses jointly. Therefore, in those states, the OP would be liable for the credit card debt, whether or not she has an authorized user card in her name. – Ben Miller Aug 4 '17 at 3:31
  • New York State.. – user61277 Aug 4 '17 at 4:02
  • Being legally liable for the debt is not the same as being identified as liable by credit reporting agencies or considered liable by credit-granting institutions, since the account may not show up under your name on credit reports. – Craig Aug 4 '17 at 6:16
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More importantly, does that make me liable for the debt on that credit account as far as credit card company is concerned?

No. New York is not a community property state. Each spouse's assets and debts are their own. Authorized users are not liable for payments.

It may still affect your credit. And it may become your debt on divorce if that's what a judge thinks is fair. But so long as you stay married, it is not your obligation, only your spouse's.

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If you are an authorized user on the credit card, then depending on the bank, some will report that account to your credit report.

Authorized users are generally not responsible for the debt incurred on the account. However, again, because it is reported to your credit score, you can still feel the negative effects if the account becomes outstanding. On the flip side, it can help your credit if the account is current.

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