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First let me be clear here, I thoroughly understand that economy in general is very convoluted and volatile. I am not expecting myself to somehow do well especially in practical terms in a short period of time or any foreseeable future really. I only want to pick it up as I enjoy learning and recently I really start to gain interest in some of the papers I come across on econometric. I enjoy learning things especially things that are less well understood. My education background is a PhD in ontology; however, my current job mostly works with fields like convex analysis, mostly real-time machine learning and things to do with said field (probability, information, topology, linear algebra vector calculus discrete math lie group etc etc).

My understanding of stochastic statistics would be weaker than many who work in the field, I read these are much more prominent in financing than things I am familiar with. But I am happy to put in some time and get a better grasp of it.

My question however is from my background of education, what are the good list of books to read in regard to learning stock trading? I do have a day job so it wouldn't be very unlikely for me to take any course in it. However, I do get a lot of free time even when I am working so I am happy to put in more then 5 to 6 hours a day for the near future. As I said I am not looking to make a dim anytime soon I just want to learn and understand. I also am very accustomed to read very heavy books with limited language expression capabilities, so you don't have to worry there, haha.

marked as duplicate by Nate Eldredge, D Stanley, Brythan, JoeTaxpayer Mar 30 '17 at 0:37

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  • Try starting with "Trade your way to financial freedom" by Van Tharp - it is on the psychology of trading. – Victor Feb 27 '17 at 9:19
  • Work for a finance company. You'll learn much faster than reading books. You sound like the right kind of background. – SMeznaric Feb 28 '17 at 14:52
  • @SMeznaric I am very happy with my current job however. Also there is a very large chunk of my knowledge not overlapping with what they are looking for. I don't really like the idea that most of things I have worked so hard on for the pass couple of years become useless in a new job. If some day things I know become mainstream in financing I would really consider it. – Rocky Zhang Feb 28 '17 at 15:48
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Security Analysis(very difficult for beginners )& Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham.

All about(book series by McGraw) on Stocks,Derivatives,Options,Futures,Market Timings.

Reminiscence of a Stock Operator (Life of jesse Livermore). Memoirs , Popular Delusions and Madness of the Crowds by Charles Mackay.

Basics of Technical analysis includig Trading Strategies via Youtube videos & Google.

Also opt for Seeking alpha free version to learn about portfolio allocation under current scenario there will be few articles as it will ask for premium version if you love it then opt for it.

But still these books will do.

  • Thanks for commenting, I am just wondering would it be better to read about the basis or foundation of technical analysis first or just watching the videos would be enough. I personally found it easier to learn practical things after getting a grasp of what it is really about and trying to achieve in the grand scheme of things. – Rocky Zhang Feb 28 '17 at 14:40
  • Videos will give you brief intro and working of the system but check out "The Warrior Trading" & "Options Alpha" along with "Tasty Trades" Youtube Channel they have some very Good Lectures on Technical as well Fundamentals. – Yash Panchal Mar 2 '17 at 3:51

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