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Someone I know wants to borrow my card and they said they can turn £2,000 into £4,000. They send they will talk the details and I will have to take all my money out. Then they deposit £2,000 in my card and do something and make more money. They know someone working in the bank so that's why it works and they said some vague things and heard credit card flipping. Is this a scam and what type of scam, just wondering, I know they can use my identity to do illegal things but just wanted to know what kind of scam this is?

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    What do you think? – Pete B. Feb 13 '17 at 21:27
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    Money laundering, bank fraud, embezzlement, or just good old-fashioned "steal your money", there's a 100% chance someone is trying to sucker you. Reconsider your definition of "friends" - these ones are trying to steal from you, draw you into further illegal activity (use you as a fall guy or patsy), or they are incredibly foolish and are keen to pull you into someone else's scam. – BrianH Feb 13 '17 at 21:39
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    "i know the guy personally and know all of them as friends so thats not a problem", that is THE problem. – quid Feb 13 '17 at 21:55
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    Someone you know wants to do something vague because they know someone in a bank? And they want to use your credit card rather than their own? Say this out loud a few times and see if it seem silly to you. – Joe Strazzere Feb 13 '17 at 22:05
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    Completely different question but the first paragraph of this answer certainly applies: money.stackexchange.com/a/71013/17718 One of the comments to the answer is dead on: "The first paragraph is the perfect answer to so many questions on this site!" – TTT Feb 13 '17 at 22:18
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I cannot definitively say this is illegal, but we'll apply some cold hard logic to it:

If this were as easy as it sounds, why aren't they using their own account/card instead of yours?

Ask them this question directly. They will probably say something along the lines of "I don't have a card" or try to guilt you into doing it.

You should do two things:

  1. Tell them no.

  2. Report them to the police/the bank/etc.

In all likelihood, they will end up doing something illegal or they are laundering money. When push comes to shove, you will be the one the police come after asking questions. They have complete deniability as it is your card. This is no different than the "Cash this big check and send me half of it" scams that are common.

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It could be that your friend is being scammed into recruiting you as another victim. So it is vaguely possible that this isn't malicious on their part.

However, it is a scam if they are asking for your credit card info without a completely clear and good reason it's necessary. Which they have failed to do. That is reason enough to assume it's a scam, illegal, or both.

Run. And seriously consider whether these are really people you can trust on anything, never mind money. At best they're gullible.

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