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As the central banks have kept interest rates extremely low for a decade, even negative, this affects how much we save and borrow.

Can it be so that these low interest rates cause investors to take greater risk to get a decent return? Thus there is a great misallocation of resources which at some point will show itself and cause tremendous losses, even maybe cause a new financial crisis?

closed as off-topic by Grade 'Eh' Bacon, Dheer, MD-Tech, Nathan L, ChrisInEdmonton Feb 13 '17 at 15:17

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  • You are asking for speculation, which is not really in scope here... – keshlam Feb 13 '17 at 13:02
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Can it be so that these low-interest rates cause investors to take greater risk to get a decent return?

With interest rates being as low as they are, there is little to no risk in banking; especially after Dodd-Frank. "Risk" is just a fancy word for "Will I make money in the near/ long future." No one knows what the actual risk is (unless you can see into the future.) But there are ways to mitigate it. So, arguably, the best way to make money is the stock market, not in banking.

There is a great misallocation of resources which at some point will show itself and cause tremendous losses, even maybe cause a new financial crisis?

A financial crisis is backed on a believed-to-be strong investment that goes belly-up.

  1. 1930's Banks believed investing in stocks was wise.
  2. 1980's Oil was believed to be a safe investment.
  3. 2007 The housing market was suppose to be secure as can be.

"Tremendous Losses" is a rather grand term with no merit. Banks are not purposely keeping interest rates low to cause a financial crisis.

As the central banks have kept interest rates extremely low for a decade, even negative, this affects how much we save and borrow.

The biggest point here is to know one thing: bonds. Bonds affect all things from municipalities, construction, to pensions. If interest rates increased currently, the current rate of bonds would drop vastly and actually cause a financial crisis (in the U.S.) due to millions of older persons relying on bonds as sources of income.

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