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It seems like Deeds of Trust's for real estate properties (which are public records) include the loan amount on them (assuming a loan was obtained for the purchase of the property). Obviously this loan amount would exclude any down payment but it seems to me that if a neighboring property was purchased with a loan for twice the amount of the tax appraised value of the property that it's not unreasonable to ask that much from a prospective buyer as well?

edit: the actual sale price is not available in the state of TX. Quoting http://www.traviscad.org/faq_Misconceptions.html ,

The Travis Central Appraisal District does not have access to all sales information due to Texas being a non-sales disclosure State. This means that real estate sales transactions are not given to the Appraisal District. Each appraisal district must research all available data in the market place by contacting realtors, brokers, property sellers, and buyers to obtain sales information. Through this process the district receives some of the sales, but not all. Any and all sales evidence you can provide to the district will ensure proper valuation of your property.

  • Don't the public records also list the actual sale price, not just the loan amount? – Ben Miller Jun 29 '16 at 15:37
  • I don't think they do in Texas. If they do that'd be news to me. – neubert Jun 29 '16 at 15:40
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    Tax appraised values typically have little (or nothing) to do with sales price, or even market price. – Pete B. Jun 29 '16 at 16:51
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I hold a real estate license. I can tell you that when determining a fair price, the liens on properties nearby don't even get looked at. The last house I sold was on a street that was developed as a single project, 50 years ago. The first thing to look at was sales over the last few years. Then adjust up/down for improvements/work needed, etc. In general, the most recent sale is the most valuable bit of information.

  • I don't think the most recent sale price is available in Texas. If it is available that'd be news to me. Sure, the asking prices are available on MLS, but the sale prices? None of zillow.com, trulia.com, etc report that for any property I've ever looked at. – neubert Jun 29 '16 at 15:41
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    Quoting goo.gl/gkS3Ie "The Travis Central Appraisal District does not have access to all sales information due to Texas being a non-sales disclosure State.This means that real estate sales transactions are not given to the Appraisal District.Each appraisal district must research all available data in the market place by contacting realtors, brokers, property sellers, and buyers to obtain sales information.Through this process the district receives some of the sales, but not all.Any and all sales evidence you can provide to the district will ensure proper valuation of your property." – neubert Jun 29 '16 at 15:43
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    MLS has the sale price. It's required for the agent to close the listing after a sale. If I see recent houses sell for above list price, that's information I can use. If all sell well below, that's info too. Knowledge is power. Where I live, real estate agents are common. You should find a friend, or friend of friend who is an agent, and ask for help gathering data. – JoeTaxpayer Jun 29 '16 at 15:44
  • Well, gee, maybe you should let every appraisal district in Texas know that! – neubert Jun 29 '16 at 15:46
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    @neubert why are you arguing with a realtor that the private association of realtors has more complete and accurate information by business process, than the government is entitled to by statute? – user662852 Jun 29 '16 at 15:52
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The property is only worth what the buyer is willing to pay for it. Whether the seller got a better or worse deal than usual realy is not something the buyer cares about.

  • Sure, but the buyer has a vested interest in purchasing the property for as little as possible. If I could buy Rockefeller Center in NYC for $1.00 I'd do so in a heart beat but they have ample reason to assume that they could fetch far more money than the measly $1.00 that I'm totally willing to pay. As a seller you're not going to have any idea what the buyers upper bound is but the end goal of the seller is ultimately to maximize the money that they get. And if you have reason to assume that you could make a lot more off of the property then by all means you should try. – neubert Jun 29 '16 at 15:33

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