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I am a 20 year old investor, so far my trading account is quite small (~10k) so I haven't made many large trades, most have been worth a couple thousand dollars.

I noticed in my broker (TD Web Broker) that after I place a sell trade that the fill status on my trades gets completed 100% fill status immediately after I place the trade. So if I sold 50 shares, 50 of those shares gets filled immediately and sold after I finalize the trade.

I can't help but wonder what will happen when my trades start increasing in value and whether or not they will get sold to completion the day of the trade.

My question: Do trades always get filled immediately, and if not what kind of price of a trade would see not being filled completely immediately?

This might be somewhat variable depending on someone else buying the shares you are selling, but in general what would be the constraints of the question I'm asking?

  • I don't have time to write a real answer now, but the info you need can be found in any basic equity trading explainer. – dg99 May 27 '16 at 22:56
  • This can largely depend on the type of orders you use and the market depth at the time (that is, the liquidity of the stock). – Victor May 28 '16 at 2:12
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I place a trade, a limit order on a thinly traded stock. I want to buy 1000 shares at $10. The current price is $10.50. Someone places a market order for 500 shares. Another trader has a limit order for $10.10 for 400 shares. His order fills, and I get 100 at my price. I wait another day to see if I get any more shares. This is just an example of how it can work. I can place my order as "all or none" if I wish to avoid this.

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    +1 - Or you can place a market order and as long as there is enough in the market depth you will buy it all immediately. – Victor May 27 '16 at 23:50

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