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I am interested to find out which currencies are the highest traded. For instance, if someone travels from the UK to the US (as a tourist) and converts pounds to dollars, or a company that deals with companies or provides services to people in different markets. So far searching on Google has only produced hits for companies that offer a conversion service. I imagine there would be three or four different ways currency trade could occur: personal, business, stock market and maybe countries.

How can I find a list of which currencies are traded the most (in terms of value), preferably broken down into categories?


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I am looking for information exactly like this that was provided in the answer.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Victor, Dheer, JoeTaxpayer Jan 8 '16 at 12:55

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This is actually a fairly hard question to answer well as much of the currency trading that is done in financial markets is actually done directly with banks and other financial institutions instead of on a centralized market and the banks are understandably not always excited to part with information on how exactly they do their business. Other methods of currency exchange have much, much less volume though so it is important to understand the trading through markets as best as possible.

Some banks do give information on how much is traded so surveys can give a reasonable indication of relative volume by currency. Note the U.S. Dollar is by far the largest volume of currency traded partially because people often covert one currency to another in the markets by trading "through" the Dollar. Wikipedia has a good explanation and a nicely formatted table of information as well.

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