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I don't have experience on stock market. But I heard that people are losing on the stock market. While we look at live graph of stock value we could judge the current value of stock. So why does the profit become uncertain? Is the sales took the amount of current stock value? Or is there any delay after we place the stock on sale?

What I want to know is if I place the sale on a particular time by looking at the value of stock. Will the same price reflected on my sale?

closed as too broad by Dheer, Joe, Nathan L, JoeTaxpayer Nov 13 '15 at 19:31

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    have you read money.stackexchange.com/questions/3765/… ? note that the price is just the last price at which a trade took place and that your trade will have to find someone to take it - you have to sell the stock to someone! – MD-Tech Nov 13 '15 at 16:40
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As stock prices have declined, the net worth of people has come down. Imagine owning a million shares of a stock worth $100/share. This is worth $100,000,000. Now, if the stock is suddenly trading at $50/share then some would say you have lost $50,000,000.

The value of the stock is less. The uncertainty is always there as there are differences between one day's close and another day's open possibly. The sale price is likely to be near the last trade is what is being used here.

If you place a market order to sell your stock, the price may move between the time the order is placed and when it is filled. There are limit orders that could be used if you want to control the minimum price you get though you give up that the order has to be filled as otherwise people could try to sell shares for millions of dollars that wouldn't work out well.

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