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I have few months of data for some company like opening, high, low, closing, volume .

As given at https://www.google.com/finance/historical?q=NYSE%3ABME&ei=DSIeVtGMAYrvuATEsZfACA

Can someone please explain me what each value stands for? Is it stock values? and then what is the volume?

Also what is

{PE}x trailing P/E, a {PS}x P/S ratio and a trailing P/FCF of {MARKETCAP/FCF} 


REVENUEGROWTH1YR current quarter% from REVENUEGROWTH1YR previous quarter

{NETINCGROWTH1YR current quarter}% year-over-year vs. prior quarter’s {NETINCGROWTH1YR previous quarter}% rise 
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Opening - is the price at which the first trade gets executed at the start of the trading day (or trading period).

High - is the highest price the stock is traded at during the day (or trading period).

Low - is the lowest price the stock is traded at during the day (or trading period).

Closing - is the price at which the last trade gets executed at the end of the trading day (or trading period).

Volume - is the amount of shares that get traded during the trading day (or trading period). For example, if you bought 1000 shares during the day and another 9 people also bought 1000 shares each, then the trading volume for the day would be 10 x 1000 = 10,000.

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    don't forget that on most exchanges opening and closing are part of the two auctions – MD-Tech Oct 14 '15 at 12:14
  • @Victor: thanks, well any idea about other terms I have added – user123 Oct 14 '15 at 12:41
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    Price/Earnings - Price/Sales - Price/Free Cash Flow are the other three. Trailing means it trails the current quarter - not sure how long it trails though since it doesn't mention. The revenue growth are %'s that the revenues have grown that quarter. – Ross Oct 14 '15 at 13:05
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One of the most useful ways to depict Open, High, Low, Close, and Volume is with a Candlestick Chart. I like to use the following options from Stockcharts.com:

http://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=SPY&p=D&yr=0&mn=3&dy=0&id=p57211761385

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