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I have an account in my local bank in Russia. I have sent the account details to the UK firm to receive a payment from them. Specifically, I provided SWIFT code of my bank and my 20-digit account number (it is not IBAN, here in Russia we do not have IBANs).

Yesterday I have received a call from my local bank. They told the the payment had arrived, but the money sender failed to specify my account number. They have only specified SWIFT code and my address. And in order to receive my money, money sender has to send an additional SWIFT message, where my account number must be specified. And the money transfer will remain "frozen" (or "blocked") until such a message would be received.

I have informed the UK firm about it, but it seems they do not understand what to do.

I am not an expert in banking stuff, so my question is: does addional SWIFT message make sense? Is it technically possible? Do I use correct terms to explain the problem?

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Yesterday I have received a call from my local bank. They told the the payment had arrived, but the money sender failed to specify my account number. They have only specified SWIFT code and my address. And in order to receive my money, money sender has to send an additional SWIFT message, where my account number must be specified. And the money transfer will remain "frozen" (or "blocked") until such a message would be received.

In this case normally your local bank has to send a SWIFT MT199 to the sending Bank that the account number quoted is missing. The Sending Bank would contact the company and send back a SWIFT message with required info.

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The person you're talking to is probably someone in the company. They need to convey the message to their bank. So you need to explain it to them as if they were 3 year old kids. You may be used to SWIFT transactions because that's how you always get paid, but unless the UK firm regularly employes Russian freelancers, this is probably the first time ever they have heard of it. Similarly, someone in the local branch of their community bank has probably never heard of it before either. In Europe they use IBANs and SWIFTs are rather uncommon.

Be patient, explain the issue and the solution in as many words as you can, and suggest them putting you on speaker at the bank so that you could talk directly to the person executing the transaction. If you do the same on your side and let the bankers talk directly to each other - that would probably be ideal.

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