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Here is an excerpt from the USCIS website which answeres the following in response to the following question:

Can the beneficiary of a visa petition seek Premium Processing Service?

No, except in cases where the petition is eligible to be filed as a self-petition (i.e., the petitioner and the beneficiary are the same). Otherwise, only the petitioner, or the attorney or representative who has filed a notice of appearance (Form G-28) on behalf of the petitioner, may request Premium Processing Service for a designated petition. The petitioner, attorney or representative, or beneficiary may pay the Premium Processing Service fee, but the beneficiary cannot sign or file the Form I-907.

Well, the first line says No , however the last line says that The petitioner, attorney or representative, or beneficiary may pay the Premium Processing Service fee, but the beneficiary cannot sign or file the Form I-907. Could anyone please clarify if instead of employer, employee can pay the fees if he wants to?

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  • You can pay the fee, but the employer must sign and file the form to request Premium Processing Service. – mkennedy Jan 14 '15 at 0:55
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Employee can pay, employee cannot file the forms. You need to convince the employer to actually ask for premium processing even if you're willing to pay for it yourself.

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  • Thanks for the answer. So, if I decide to pay,do I need to write a check to employer first and then they would write all the fees related check to USCIS or can my employer send a separate check from me along with other fees payment to the USCIS? – John Jan 14 '15 at 17:06
  • Also, since petitioner is my employer and beneficiary is me,the above description in my post says unless both are same, one cannot pay PPS? Could you explain why it is written like that? Thanks – John Jan 14 '15 at 17:09
  • The employer can send your check, but the employer is the one filling the paperwork and submitting. – littleadv Jan 15 '15 at 4:06

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