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These two conflicting articles by the same author apply to the US, but what about in Canada? I'm only interested in one or two credit cards, so should I just apply singly one at a time?

Will a Credit Card Application Hurt My Credit Score?

Ten percent (10%) of your credit score takes into account applications for credit. Each time you make an application, the creditor checks your credit to decide whether to approve you for the credit card. An inquiry is placed on your credit report and included in your credit score. The more credit card applications you put in, the more your credit score will drop.

http://credit.about.com/od/applyforcredit/fl/Being-Turned-Down-Wont-Hurt-Your-Credit.htm

That’s the good news – being turned down for credit doesn’t affect your credit score (but your credit score could be the reason you were turned down). However, that you applied for credit at all can affect your credit score since inquiries are 10% of your score

  • I just read reuters.com/article/2012/04/18/…, whence I quote: 'Both Sprauve and Ulzheimer caution that if you want to embrace this philosophy of loading up on credit, going on an application binge isn't going help. It takes time for your credit history to form. Also, applying for a series of cards one right after the other will push down your credit score, because credit applications have a negative impact.' – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Jan 7 '15 at 3:22
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The quotes you posted do not conflict.

A credit card application will drop your score by a few points, regardless of whether you get approved or not. Rejected applications don't lower your score any more than approved ones do; that's what the second quote means by:

being turned down for credit doesn’t affect your credit score

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There's no conflict here. Being turned down for credit does not affect your credit score. But the credit check performed when applying for credit does affect your credit score. So it's the application process that has the effect, due to the companies performing a credit check.

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