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Today I was involved in a low speed accident. The driver in front was pulling into the roundabout and stalled his car. I hit the vehicle at around 5-10mph.

My question is what happens with regards to insurance, as the vehicle in front has informed me he wants to go through his insurance.

I have 6 years protected no-claims discount. Will I lose this all, part or none?

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    You don't state a country but mention roundabout and mph so I'll assume UK. Insurance is much different between US and UK. – AbraCadaver Dec 16 '14 at 19:22
  • It can even depend on the insurance company. – mhoran_psprep Dec 16 '14 at 19:41
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    The point of paying for "protected" no-claims discount is that you don't lose the discount or part of it after a single accident. I'd try to make sure that the driver in front isn't trying an insurance scam, if you think his driving was suspicious. – gnasher729 Dec 17 '14 at 1:37
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    By the way, NEVER say "it was my fault". That can get you into legal trouble and trouble with your insurance. If you have to, say "I think my insurance will classify it as my fault" or something similar. Your insurance could say "we would have fought this case but couldn't because you said it was your fault, so now you can pay for the damage yourself". – gnasher729 Dec 31 '14 at 10:18
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    @AbraCadaver There are lots of roundabouts in the US; they are becoming more popular every year. – Ben Miller - Reinstate Monica Dec 31 '14 at 16:42
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You should call your insurance company and ask them. It's likely addressed in your insurance policy, but it's easier to call and ask than to decipher all the legalese. You're not giving up any sort of secrecy by asking them, they'll know you were in an accident because they get updates from police reports (there is a police report, right?).

Never admit fault, even if you're a nice and honest person. Let the police determine whether fault is assignable. (Driving a car that is unfit for the road may be a factor in assigning fault to the other driver, or in at least sharing fault.)

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