2

Someone in another state asked me to be his personal assistant. From the start I was suspicious. He said he was doing a lot of projects in my state and needed my help. Then he said he needed to transfer some money to my account (via mobile), but in order to do so he requires my full name, account number, username, and password.

I've never heard of this. Please advise, as this sounds really weird and risky!

  • 12
    It's a scam. Never give out financial passwords to anyone, ever. – Rocky Dec 10 '14 at 0:36
  • I can shorten that sentence. Never give out passwords to anyone, ever. – David Thornley Aug 31 '18 at 21:27
  • 1
    A better title for this question would be "Someone wants my account details and password to transfer money away from me". – Pete Becker Sep 1 '18 at 11:19
18

Of course it is a scam.

They don't need your password to give you money. Even giving them the rest is enough information for them to try and withdraw money from your bank by automatic transfer.

  • I am very cautious about giving my account number to someone who is not a known, reputable business, for fear they might try to initiate an electronic withdrawal. Yes, anyone asking for you user name and password is a scammer, period. – Jay Dec 11 '14 at 20:38
10

I have prepared a report on scam's like this. I'd be happy to deliver a copy of the report to your home. Just give me your address and mail me the keys to your house and I'll drop by and leave it in your home. Oh, and tell me a time when you won't be home, so I won't bother you when I come by. It might also be helpful if you tell me if you have any cash, jewelry, or other valuables in the house and where you keep them, so I can give you advice on security measures. :-)

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    +1 for answer. -1 for not enough spelling and grammar mistakes to be plausible. =) – dg99 Dec 11 '14 at 20:52
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    @dg99 Good point! On a serious note: When I get an email that claims to be from a big company, and it has more than one spelling or grammar error, I immediately conclude that it's a scam. When people can't even get the name of the organization right, forget it. Like I've gotten several from the "FBI Division of Cybercrimes Division". Umm, no. – Jay Dec 11 '14 at 22:06
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    @Jay It is claimed that these spelling errors are intentional. Without the spelling errors, they might be able to engage with slightly stupid people, but convincing them to pay money is a lot of hard work and will usually fail because they are only slightly stupid. Only someone really stupid responds to the "FBI Division of Cybercrimes Division", so the scammer gets only responses from people that are stupid enough to be made to pay. – gnasher729 Sep 1 '18 at 22:19
3

That sounds pretty fishy to me. I'm an IT professional - I can determine more about him if I have full access to the email headers. Just give me your email and your password so I can log in and check the email he's using to contact you.

  • 1
    lol, not sure why you're getting voted down, his gullibility is key and you found a creative way to point it out to him. – jadoti Dec 12 '14 at 17:24
0

Scammers know you're not stupid enough to fall for this. So when you balk, he'll understand and offer to send you a check. When he sends you a check, he'll say cash it, keep $XXX for yourself, then forward him the rest for some other expense (or even possibly send it to someone else). Know in advance that that's a scam, too. When his fake check bounces you'll already be out the money and he'll be long gone.

"If it's too good to be true, it probably is"

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