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  • What is the limit I can make when it comes to working while on Social Security?

  • If I get a prepaid debit card for the money I make, do I have to report my earnings? How do I go about doing this?

  • There is no limit to what you "can make" while receiving Social Security benefits. What does happen is that more and more of your Social Security benefits become subject to Federal income tax when your total annual income is too large. In this situation, if you are on Medicare, you may also be required to pay Medicare premiums (not Medicare tax) to get Medicare benefits. The Social Security Administration can withhold income tax (at a rate that you get to choose from among a set of fixed percentages) and Medicare premiums from your Social Security payment and send this money to the IRS. – Dilip Sarwate Sep 29 '14 at 2:09
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    What kind of Social Security benefits? The answer for retirement benefits will be very different than for disability. – Nate Eldredge Sep 29 '14 at 6:05
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If I get a prepaid debit card for the money I make do I have to report my earnings? How do I go about doing this?

Yes you must report this. It doesn't matter if they put it in your bank account, or on a debit card, or cash under the table. You have to report the income. You can count on your employer reporting the income to the IRS.

What is the limit I can make when it comes to working while on social security?

The Social Security Administration has all sort of info regarding working and receiving benefits. The exact answer depends on the type of benefit (retirement, disability, survivor) and your age (pre-full retirement age, the year you reach retirement age, post retirement age)

I would look at their website: http://www.ssa.gov/retire2/whileworking.htm for examples:

You can work while you receive Social Security retirement (or survivors) benefits. When you do, it could mean a higher benefit for you in the future.

Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. We pay the increase retroactive to January the year after you earned the money

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  • Curious why you are quoting a section that doesn't address the question. OP asked how much he can earn before current benefits are impacted. – JTP - Apologise to Monica Sep 29 '14 at 13:23
  • There are too many possibilities without knowing age, and type of payment. I considered constructing a more detailed answer but felt it was too complex with too may unknowns. – mhoran_psprep Sep 29 '14 at 13:48

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