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I recently moved to UK for a full time job, and I get my salary transferred to UK bank account, and automatically tax calculated.
At the same time I own few websites and I get some money from these website every few months, Now i want to get this money in my new UK bank account, does this mean that gov will take taxes from this money as well.
Also one of my family members send us money every few months and will send to this bank from now on, does taxes also apply on this?

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Now i want to get this money in my new UK bank account, does this mean that gov will take taxes from this money as well.

Yes that is income and you have to pay tax on that. But it might be a bit complicated than that, so I would ask you to call up HMRC or visit an accountant or maybe ask the finance people of your employer.

Also one of my family members send us money every few months and will send to this bank from now on, does taxes also apply on this?

See the HMRC page about capital gains tax on gifts:

Gifts to your husband, wife or civil partner

You won't have to pay Capital Gains Tax when you give a gift to your husband, wife or civil partner - as long as both of the following apply:

  • you've lived together for at least part of the tax year in which you made the gift
  • the gift isn't 'trading stock' -trading goods bought for resale However, if your husband, wife or civil partner later sells or disposes of the asset, they'll have to pay the tax on any gain. Tax will be due on any gain made over the total period of ownership - yours and theirs. But they'll only need to work out the gain since 31 March 1982. There's now no Capital Gains Tax due on gains arising before that date.

It's useful to keep a note of what the asset cost you. Your spouse or civil partner may need this to work out their Capital Gains Tax when they dispose of the asset.

Example:

Mr B lives with his wife and gives her an antique table that he bought for £12,000 in 2003. Mrs B spends £500 restoring the table, eventually selling it for £20,000.

Her total costs are £12,500 (£500 plus Mr B's original cost £12,000). Mrs B's gain is £7,500 (£20,000 less £12,500).

Gifts to other family members and 'connected people'

When you make a gift to a family member or other person you're connected with, you'll need to work out the gain or loss. This doesn't apply to gifts you make to your spouse or civil partner.

This also applies if you dispose of an asset to them in any other way - for example, you sell it to them for a low price.

A 'connected person' in this context is someone such as your brother, sister, child, parent, grandparent, mother-in-law or business partner. Follow the link below for more information about connected people and Capital Gains Tax.

You must get a valuation of the asset at the time you made the gift. Use this value in place of any amount you received for the asset to work out your gain or loss. If you gave the asset away, then of course the amount you received for it will be nothing.

If you make a loss you can only deduct the loss from gains you make on gifts or other disposals to the same person.

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