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I am looking for historical company performance data that goes back at least 10 years. I could pay for it but if it's free it would be fantastic.

Company performance indicators that I am looking for are:
Return on Invested Capital (ROIC)
Equity growth rate
Earnings Per Share (EPS) growth rate
Sales growth rate
Free Cash growth rate
Price to earnings ratio (PE)

I tried looking in nasdaq.com , finance.yahoo.com and other major sites, but all I could find was daily historic data of stock value changes.

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  • Welcome. Where you have already looked? What kind of searches have you already tried? From what you have already found, what wasn't good enough? – MrChrister Jul 5 '14 at 20:18
  • I tried looking in nasdaq.com , finance.yahoo.com and other major sites but all I could find was day to day historic data of stock changes. – Matas Vaitkevicius Jul 5 '14 at 23:11
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For free, 5 years is somewhat available, and 10 years is available to a limited extent on money.msn.com.

Some are calculated for you.

Gurufocus is also a treasure trove of value statistics that do in fact reach back 10 years.

From the Gurufocus site, the historical P/E can be calculated by dividing their figure for "Earnings per Share" by the share price at the time. It looks like their EPS figure is split adjusted, so you'll have to use the split adjusted share price.

"Free cash", defined in the comments as money held at the end of the year, can be found on the balance sheet as "Cash, Cash Equivalents, Marketable Securities"; however, the more common term is "free cash flow", and its growth rate can be found at the top of the gurufocus financials page.

  • Fantastic, this is exactly what I was looking for. I can get first 4 indicators I am looking for ROIC =(TOTAL NET INCOME)/(CURRENT ASSETS - CURRENT LIABILITIES), Equity Growth = Year(CURRENT ASSETS - CURRENT LIABILITIES)/ (Year-1)(CURRENT ASSETS - CURRENT LIABILITIES), EPS = Year(EPS)/(Year-1)(EPS), SALES = Year(SALES)/(Year-1)(SALES), and the last two are missing any suggestion where I could get those would be much appreciated. Thanks. – Matas Vaitkevicius Jul 6 '14 at 8:33
  • How are you defining "free cash"? Do you mean free cash flow, or cash not spoken for by some future time frame of obligation? – user11865 Jul 7 '14 at 17:03
  • By 'free cash' I mean money that company owns at the end of the year, it can be paid out as dividends, reinvested or kept as buffer for 'rainy day'. – Matas Vaitkevicius Jul 7 '14 at 17:09
  • @LIUFA OK, please note edit. – user11865 Jul 8 '14 at 1:35
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The S&P report (aka STARS report) for each company has 10 years of financial data. These reports are available free at several online brokers (like E-Trade) if you have an account with the brokerage.

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I know of no free source for 10 years historical data on a large set of companies. Now, if it's just a single company or small number that interest you, contact Investor Relations at the company(ies) in question; they may be willing to send you the data for free.

  • Hello. I am looking for as large volume as possible, I am doing investment analysis based on criteria listed above, and more data I can get better result will be. Doing it company by company is a possibility if I would do analysis of 5 years data and then for companies that look exceptional I could then request data one by one. Thank you that is a great suggestion. – Matas Vaitkevicius Jul 6 '14 at 8:14
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Morningstar has that 10 history at http://financials.morningstar.com/ratios/r.html?t=JNJ&region=usa&culture=en-US

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