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A few questions here... I tried searching, but my situation seems too complicated (to me, anyway).

Summary: I worked as an employee for the first half of 2013 (Jan through June) in Maine (with state tax). Then, I moved to Washington (no state tax) and became an independent contractor (Sep - current). I haven't received a 1099 from my employer, and I'm attempting to file the Schedule C form. I don't have anything to deduct, just trying to pay my taxes before I get fined.

I'm trying to do taxes through Taxhawk.com, but it seems like I may need to do the actual forms in order to file separately; I don't think I can file twice through that site.

It's my understanding that the Schedule C must be attached to the 1040, but the 1040 is asking for W-2 income, which I haven't received, so... I can't file the 1040 yet, or I can file it twice?

Questions:

  • Can I file my 1040 with Schedule C before having received the W2?
  • Then, would I need to file a second 1040-EZ with the W2 information?
  • Where do I find out which state to pay taxes to, or if I need to? I haven't found this question on a form yet.
  • Should I have received a 1099 from my IC employer?
  • As I worked from Sep to now, should I have been making quarterly payments? What's the form for this?

Thanks very much for any insight you can provide!

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Can I file my 1040 with Schedule C before having received the W2?

No.

Then, would I need to file a second 1040-EZ with the W2 information?

No, you only file 1040 once a year. All of your data should be on it. If you need to change or correct mistakes, 1040X form is submitted, you never submit 1040 again after submitting it once. However, in this case, 1040X with W2 that didn't appear on the original 1040 will likely to raise an eyebrow (i.e.: trigger an audit), as it is very rare that people don't know that they're going to get a W2 and don't submit it with the original 1040.

Where do I find out which state to pay taxes to, or if I need to? I haven't found this question on a form yet.

What form? You should check the tax departments of the states involved for their rules and requirements. Hire a tax professional licensed to operate in these states (EA/CPA or a tax preparer, some states license tax preparers as well).

Should I have received a 1099 from my IC employer?

By January 31st. Same as your W2.

As I worked from Sep to now, should I have been making quarterly payments? What's the form for this?

Yes, using form 1040-ES. But its a bit too late for that now, you can start for 2014. Talk to your tax adviser.


You obviously have no clue at what you're doing. I suggest hiring a EA/CPA licensed in your State (Washington?), and have him/her help you with your tax preparation and educate you on your rights and liabilities.

For example:

I'm attempting to file the Schedule C form. I don't have anything to deduct,

I seriously doubt that you don't have anything to deduct. How about your moving expenses? Your home office? Your laptop? Health insurance? SEP IRA/Solo 401k? There's always things to deduct for a sole proprietor, you just need to know what is allowable, and what documentation you should be keeping to support your deductions. For that - you need a tax professional to guide you.

  • Thanks so much for clearing up those questions! Taxes have never been challenging before, and I was hoping there was something simple that I was missing. I guess not. As far as deductibles, moving was unrelated to the job, "home office" is shared space, no health insurance, no IRA, 401k... Basically I just got roped into taking a job that doesn't want to pay my taxes/provide benefits = independent contractor. Anyway, thanks again! – Shwarz Jan 1 '14 at 2:33
  • @Shwarz who said moving has to be related for it to be deductible? Why don't you have IRA/401k? These are things you should be discussing with your tax adviser and considering them. When I said "you have no clue" - that's what I meant. You don't know what you don't know, so go and educate yourself, it is your money. – littleadv Jan 1 '14 at 2:54
  • Searching for a tax adviser right now. You're absolutely right -- I've got no clue. Thanks once more! – Shwarz Jan 1 '14 at 3:00
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    A minor correction to littleadv's excellent answer: You can, and you should file Form 1040ES by January 15, 2014 which is the due date for the 4th quarterly payment of estimated tax. Since you began working in September, it is most likely that by filing the long version of Form 2210 (that takes into account the variation in income over the year), you will avoid penalties for underpayment of estimated tax entirely. Talk to your tax advisor about this too, and right away, since time is of the essence here. – Dilip Sarwate Jan 1 '14 at 6:59

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