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We have been taught since young that education is sacred and that a college degree is a passport to a good future in life. However, today's traditional college cost is really very high and there comes a point when even a very good thing becomes overpriced and burdensome to the buyer.

Does it make economic sense for our students to go for a cheaper online degree rather than a traditional college degree? My worry is that the online degree is less recognized and it is harder to find good jobs.

closed as off-topic by DJClayworth, JoeTaxpayer, Dheer, sdg, DumbCoder Oct 30 '13 at 12:33

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    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about education and not finance. – DJClayworth Oct 27 '13 at 18:50
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My worry is that the online degree is less recognized and it is harder to find good jobs.

You get what you pay for. "On-line degree" is not really the issue. The issue is the recognition and the reputation of the degree (and the institution). It may hurt you more to have a degree from some bogus on-line site not accredited by anyone on your resume than no degree at all.

That said, there are "on-line degree"s from some universities that are above and beyond any other. Not all the employers may know each and every university, so you have to be careful with it, but I'd, for example, prefer a graduate of The Open University over a graduate of almost any US college any time. There are several very reputable Open Universities in the world modeled after the UK one.

  • Thanks for the answer. The key is really finding a well-recognized online degree provider. They will provide good competition to traditional colleges who have been ripping off our young generation – curious Oct 27 '13 at 8:43
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    @curious online or not has nothing to do with that. You're probably from the US. You'd be surprised to know that there are excellent universities there in the world where students don't pay a penny to study, and even get some stipend. That's called "socialism", a word an average American considers a curse. – littleadv Oct 27 '13 at 8:56
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+1 on littleadv's worry.

Degree mills notwithstanding I would dispute that online degrees are cheaper then in person degrees. The most cost effective option is almost always 2 years of in state community college, and transfer to a state university (assuming that you are talking about the US).

Almost all offer online options for classes, UCF has 60% of their upper division business classes conducted online.

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