7

For example, the latest option date on a particular stock is Jan 2014, but I want to buy an April 2014 option. According to Google Finance, none exists.

Is there any way I can place any order for such an option at a particular strike? Am a retail investor using Interactive Brokers.

8

Not that I am aware. There are times that an option is available, but none have traded yet, and it takes a request to get a bid/ask, or you can make an offer and see if it's accepted. But the option chain itself has to be open.

3

Double check with your broker, but if a series isn't open yet for trading, you can't trade it.

If there is a series trading without open interest (rare), simply work your open, as options are created at trade.

If you have enough money, do this https://money.stackexchange.com/questions/21839/list-of-cflex-2-0-brokers

3

You can call CBOE and tell them you want that series or a particular contract.

And this has nothing to do with FLEX. Tell them there is demand for it, if they ask who you are, DONT SAY YOU ARE A RETAIL INVESTOR, the contracts will be in the option chain the next day.

I have done this plenty of times. The CBOE does not care and are only limited by OCC and the SEC, but the CBOE will trade and list anything if you can think of it, and convince them that "some people want to trade it" or that "it has benefits for hedging"

I've gotten 50 cent strike prices on stocks under $5 , I've gotten additional LEAPS and far dated options traded, I've gotten entire large chains created.

I also have been with prop shops before, so I could technically say I was a professional trader. But since you are using IB and are paying for data feeds, you can easily spin that too.

2

If you have an account with a major bank they may trade an over the counter option with you. Just depends how much work you need to go through and how much you are planning on buying.

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