0

I filled my W-4 as single, 0 dependents, 0 exemptions. All my pay stubs say that information as well. But I made $45,000 for the year and only $1,300 was withheld for federal income tax.

When I asked my employer about this, they state that I put $2,000 exempt on my W-4 card. I know for a fact I didn’t put that. I Wouldn’t even know where to put that. I have been filling the W-4 the same way all my life. When I asked to see my W-4 they said that they have nothing and they can’t find it.

I feel like something is wrong on their end for doing this. I checked my pay stubs and not one of them says I put any exemption. It says single, exemptions/allowance 0. I don't know where they are getting their information from if not the W-4 itself.

2
  • 1
    So file a correction for 2024, and pay the shortfall in your 2023 returns... What's your question?
    – keshlam
    Feb 6 at 2:08
  • 2
    "I filled my W-4 as single, 0 dependents, 0 exemptions." Which edition of the W-4 did you fill out? Because the 2020 and later editions of the W-4 ask you to provide four dollar amounts (dependent credit, other income, extra deductions, and extra withholding) on the form that you turn in. Only the 2019 and prior editions of the W-4 ask you to provide an integer number of allowances on the part that you turn in.
    – user102008
    Feb 6 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

1

Payroll departments shouldn't make mistakes, but sometimes they do. Ultimately it's your responsibility to keep an eye on your paystubs and make sure your withholding is being done correctly. If your income has been fairly consistent, it should have been fairly obvious that your paychecks were $75 too high (if weekly) or $150 too high (if every other week).

The IRS has a handy online tool for checking your withholdings. You can enter your paystub information and other data, and it will tell you if you're on track or suggest adjustments if not. If wouldn't hurt to use it quarterly to make sure everything is going OK, if you don't want to calculate the withholding amounts by hand.

1

I have experienced a number of federal or state W-4 issues over the years. Most of them have gone away since many companies have put the submission of the W-4 online. That makes it easier for me to check that the W-4 values are what I expect, and I can update the form easily if I want to adjust the withholding to match changes in my financial position.

My advice is always check the pay stub to make sure that what is being withheld matches your intentions. Once the year ends your ability to fix things disappears. The amount of money that you may owe when you file your return, will be impacted by this under-withholding. Checking may require the use of a spreadsheet to calculate the correct the withholding or the use of the IRS Tax Withholding Estimator

Also check your state W-4 if that applies to your situation, mistakes can be made there also.

When I asked my employer about this, they state that I put $2,000 exempt on my W-4 card. I know for a fact I didn’t put that. I Wouldn’t even know where to put that. I have been filling the W-4 the same way all my life. When I asked to see my W-4 they said that they have nothing and they can’t find it.

It sounds like you work for a small company, if they think can remember what you submitted from memory. If they use a payroll processing company some numbers must have been submitted to them.

I checked my pay stubs and not one of them says I put any exemption. It says single, exemptions/allowance 0.

That should have resulted in the maximum amount being withheld. Since that didn't happen, it looks like the section of the pay stub that is supposed to reflect your W-4 settings is missing some details. I would ask them about that problem, and they may have to complain to their payroll processing company.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .