1

We received an IRS check made out to my husband and myself. We want to deposit it into my account. How does my husband sign it over? Thanks.

3
  • You'd probably want to ask the bank in which the account is.
    – littleadv
    Oct 29, 2023 at 18:26
  • 2
    You need to ask your bank for specifics, most have more stringent rules when it comes to tax checks, but generally so long as both parties have endorsed it, it it can be deposited into an account that has at least one of those parties, though some require it into an account with both on them. Oct 29, 2023 at 18:53
  • Is communion of goods a thing in the US, if so are you married in it or not?
    – Neil Meyer
    Oct 31, 2023 at 10:23

2 Answers 2

1

It depends on the bank and your account situation.

If you have a joint account, you can both sign and deposit yourself most of the time.

If you don't have a joint account, I would both go into a branch with ID and ask what the procedure is they follow. Do not sign the check ahead of time, just both go into the bank.

If it is impossible for you both to get to a single branch call and ask for a branch manager. Explain the situation and how you can get the check cashed. Do what they say and go into the branch when you are sure that branch manager is working. If a teller gives you a hard time, ask for the branch manager.

Following that procedure is your best bet.

-1

We received an IRS check made out to my husband and myself. We want to deposit it into my account. How does my husband sign it over?

This method has worked for decades. Both people have to sign the check on the back. This is required because the check says "AND". If the check said "OR" only one would be required to sign it.

The check can be deposited into an account that is controlled by either person. It can be an individual account, or a joint account. The deposit can be in person, by ATM, or by web deposit, assuming you have enabled those options.

This is a standard occurrence. I have used it with checks from businesses or from family members.

4
  • 1
    "This is a standard occurrence. I have used it with checks from businesses or from family members." Have you used the method for Treasury checks (which IRS checks are, and if I correctly remember past postings on this topic, are not processed through ACH, but are handled specially)? In particular, they might need to be deposited into a joint account, and not an individual account as you state. Oct 29, 2023 at 22:41
  • 2
    IRS checks are actually treasury drafts and treated differently than regular private/business checks. Specifically refunds issued to a married couple may require either a joint account or both people present when depositing. Signature may not be enough.
    – littleadv
    Oct 29, 2023 at 22:56
  • 3
    I have received an IRS check in the last 5 years. It was made out to both of us, and deposited remotely into an individual account. The IRS doesn't care, the two signatures is all that is needed. If your bank is blocking it, they are behind the times. Oct 29, 2023 at 23:31
  • 1
    @mhoran_psprep that depends on state laws and bank procedures. Tax refunds (especially federal) are indeed a special case and are not the same as any other check.
    – littleadv
    Oct 30, 2023 at 3:48

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .