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I am filing late so I guesstimated my tax bill and overpaid it directly on irs.gov (to prevent penalties. So I have paid a bit too much, but have not filed.

Where (Turbotax?) can I file but not pay?

Follow-up. It is likely that I overpaid for 2021. If I file before the late filing deadline (which I have already applied, and paid, for) then do I simply deduct this from my 2022 taxes?

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    Did you pay it as "extension payment" or "balance due"? Did you make sure it was for 2021?
    – user102008
    Commented May 27, 2022 at 14:54
  • @user102008 Extension payment Commented May 28, 2022 at 6:01
  • I think Turbotax should have a place to enter extension payments paid. If filling the forms manually, it should be included in 1040 Schedule 3 line 10.
    – user102008
    Commented May 28, 2022 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

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On your 1040 line 26, you can report all past payments made for the year. https://www.irs.gov/faqs/estimated-tax/individuals#:~:text=Report%20all%20your%20estimated%20tax,your%20prior%20year%20tax%20return.

When you include those payments in your return, your tax software will consider that as a reduction of taxes still outstanding, and if you have a refund owing to you from the IRS, it will be provided after they process your return.

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    If it's paid after January 15 of the following year, it's not an estimated tax payment, but an extension payment, and should be listed on 1040 Schedule 3 line 10.
    – user102008
    Commented May 28, 2022 at 16:32
  • @user102008 Thanks for the clarification. Is it correct to say that Sched 3 line 10 would only be appropriate if you actually filed the request for extension? I'm curious if the OP just sent in an extra payment without actually filing extension. Commented May 30, 2022 at 13:23
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    Making an extension payment automatically counts as a request for extension, without the need to file a separate form. Filing a separate form for extension is only needed if you don't need to make a payment.
    – user102008
    Commented May 30, 2022 at 18:35
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When filing your taxes, the estimated pre-payments are a part of the filing and will be respected - so you wouldn’t have to pay it again.
Any way to file your taxes you would normally use works. The amount due will simply come out lower by the amount you pre-payed (potentially being a refund now).

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