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You can find the news on all the media. Didi is planning to delist from the New York Stock Exchange after only six months. It floated shares for a value about 4 billions dollars last June. If they buy back those shares at the current prices they may pay about 2.5B, that is a big margin over the initial offering. I don't know how much they paid in commissions to float the company and I don't know if the proceedings of the initial offering went to the company or the shareholders. So I would like to know if overall the operation will make a profit for the company.

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    Why would the company buy back its shares?
    – Flux
    Dec 4 '21 at 13:02
  • @Flux This is what the news say. I don't know why.
    – FluidCode
    Dec 4 '21 at 13:12
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From a Reuters article Didi shares plunge more than 20% on plan to delist from NYSE

HONG KONG, Dec 3 (Reuters) - Just five months after its debut, ride-hailing giant Didi Global (DIDI.N) said it plans to withdraw from the New York Stock Exchange and pursue a Hong Kong listing, a stunning reversal as it bends to Chinese regulators angered by its U.S. IPO.

The shares will simply trade on other exchanges, just not those in the US. The company will not be buying back the shares. As you note, the news is all over the media, you just need to carefully read the details of what China is requiring the company to do.

Edit - I am stealing from a great comment - "Shares are/were not at the exchange. They trade there. You either have the stock certificate or they're in Street Name at your broker." That should clear up any remaining confusion.

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    Can they move the shares without executing a new flotation?
    – FluidCode
    Dec 4 '21 at 13:16
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    Consider - when I was your age, one bought stock and received shares, a certificate of ownership. The fact that the building we need to send our shares to for selling will no longer be in NY, but likely Hong Kong, doesn't affect that certificate. I still own 10,000 shares of that company, whatever fraction of ownership it represents. The shares now are with the shareholders' brokers, not at the exchange. Dec 4 '21 at 13:20
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    Shares are/were not at the exchange. They trade there. You either have the stock certificate or they're in Street Name at your broker. Jan 3 at 14:29

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